art, Coding, Crafty, Milestones, Notes on everyday life, Python, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code, Together with sis

Making small animations with Python turtle

This is what I got from the kids yesterday as my Mother’s Day present. Simon has taught Neva to make little animations in Python.

This is another little video of them using working together to create a poppy flower drawing with Python turtle:

art, Crafty, Geometry Joys, Murderous Maths, Together with sis

Beautiful fractals, this time not programmed but drawn by hand in an image editor

Simon learned this technique from a wonderful channel he has recently discovered called CodeParade. He mainly follows this channel for its machine learning projects, but this cool little trick on how to draw impeccable fractals without any programming was too much geek fun to miss! By the way, CodeParade also has a wonderful series on 3D fractals!

here you see how the Koch snowflake below has been drawn in Microsoft Paint
art, Crafty, Geometry Joys, Math and Computer Science Everywhere, Math Riddles, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Simon makes gamez, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book, Together with sis

Math puzzles: Is it Possible?

Simon has been fascinated by these possible-impossible puzzles (that he picked up from the MajorPrep channel) for a couple of days. He prepared many paper visuals so that Dad and I could try solving them. This morning he produced this beautiful piece of design:

Simon showing one of the puzzles to another parent while waiting for Neva during her hockey training
Simon’s original drawing of the doors puzzle. The solution of the puzzle is based on graph theory and the Eulerian trail rule that the number of nodes with an odd degree should be either 0 or 2 to be able to draw a shape without lifting your pencil. The number of rooms with an odd number of doors in the puzzle is 4 (including the space surrounding the rectangle), that’s why it’s impossible to close all the doors by walking though each of them only once.
Simon explaining odd degree nodes
art, Coding, Geometry Joys, Murderous Maths, Museum Time, Notes on everyday life, Together with sis, Trips

Back at Stedelijk

As for Morellet’s RGB colored cells, very inspiring for a sandpiles coding project. (The photographs don’t convey half of the effect the original canvasses invoke. Morellet’s cells actually appear to be moving when you gaze at the original).
Installation by Barbara Kruger
Installation by Barbara Kruger
Read this poem from top to bottom and it’s depressing, from bottom to top and it’s empowering.
art, Coding, Crafty, JavaScript, Simon's Own Code, Together with sis

Slitscan and Edge Detection in p5.js

Simon writes:

Made a cool #slitscan effect you all can play with: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/full/Xr8F_KmnU

Code here: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/Xr8F_KmnU

I have actually figured out the appropriate way to move the image of the webcam such that the resulting trail produces a slitscan!

Simon writes: (The second pic is also me, doing sit-ups :))
Simon’s sister playing with the slitscan effect
Simon has also created a nice edge detection effect, allowing for video images to look like they were traced in pencil
art, Coding, Crafty, Group, Milestones, Murderous Maths

Getting ready for the Processing Community Day Amsterdam

Simon getting ready for his presentation at the Processing Community Day Amsterdam, printing additional copies of his ginormous Times Tables Visualization poster at the Antwerp Art Academy (made possible thanks to our wonderful friend, photographer Oxiea Villamonte). If you’re into creative coding and math, please come to the event (Simon will be speaking around 15 p.m.) There will be a limited number of Times Tables Visualization posters available for sale!

PCD Amsterdam

DAY: Saturday 9 February 2019

TIME: 10.00 – 19.00

WHERE: FIBER: Tolhuisweg 2, Amsterdam

art, Notes on everyday life, Physics, Together with sis, Trips

Amsterdam Light Festival

Simon’s first long boat trip, to see all the artwork presented at the Amsterdam Light Festival this year. Pleasantly surprised at how many pieces were inspired with his favorite themes (glass fiber, RGB perception, string theory, neural networks).

This photograph seems to convey the essence the artwork! It’s about string theory, and when you move relative to the piece the strings flicker (vibrate). Try scrolling up and down and you’ll see the same effect!