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Simon creates a playlist with Sorting Algorithms tutorials in Python

Simon’s chart of sorting algorithms ranked by efficiency

Simon has started a huge new project: a series of video tutorials about sorting algorithms. In the videos, he codes on his RaspberryPi, but here is the link to the Python code available on his GitHub page (that he continuously updates): https://gist.github.com/simon-tiger/5be70247a066f69c2578be5bb8e41e59

Today, Simon has recorded the fifth part of the series, in which he explains and applies the Quicksort algorithm. [The coding part goes very smoothly and much quicker (hehe) than in the previous sorting videos we have made so far. Simon also came up with his own code, he didn’t look the code up].

the quicksort video

And here come the previous parts of Simon’s sorting algorithms series, also available via this link to a playlist on his YouTube channel (there will be more videos coming):

the bubble sort video
the selection sort video
the insertion sort video (took Simon two days to make)
the merge sort video (was the most painful one)

Simon is also fascinated by more exotic sorting algorithms, such as a sorting network:

Simon used the following resources: Daniel Shiffman’s tutorial on Quicksort, Timo Bingmann’s sort algorithms visualization, Must Know Sorting Algorithms in Python, a medium blog on sorting algorithms, Brilliant.org’s computer science courses, Wikipedia.


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Simon speaking at the Processing Community Day in Amsterdam

Simon had his first public performance in front of a large audience last Saturday (February 9, 2019): he spoke about his Times Tables Visualization project at the Processing Community Day in Amsterdam!

Simon speaking at Processing Community Day Amsterdam

Simon writes: You can access the code of the poster and the animation (and the logo for my upcoming company!) and download the presentation in PowerPoint, on GitHub at https://github.com/simon-tiger/times_tables

If you’d like to buy a printed copy of the poster, please contact me and I’ll send you one. Status: 3 LEFT.

One of the tweets about Simon’s presentation
Simon next to his poster after the presentation
Working on his presentation the day before
Waiting to speak
Experimenting with other projects at the community day
At the entrance to the venue, with the poster still packed
There was a lot of interest in Simon’s project
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Fluid Dynamics: Laughing and Crying

Simon was watching Daniel Shiffman’s live coding lesson on Wednesday, and when fluid dynamics and Navier-Stokes equations came up (describing the motion of fluid in substances and used to model currents and flow), Simon remarked in the live chat that the Navier–Stokes equations are actually one of the seven most important unsolved math problems and one can get a million dollar prize for solving them, awarded by the Clay Mathematics Institute.

(I looked this up on Wikipedia and saw that it has not yet been proven whether solutions always exist in 3D and, if they do exist, whether they are “smooth” or infinitely differentiable at all points in the domain).

We had read an in-depth history of the Navier–Stokes equations in Ian Stewart’s book several weeks ago, but I must confess I didn’t remember much of what we’d read anymore. “Is it that chapter where Stewart describes how Fourier’s paper got rejected by the French Academy of Sciences because his proof wasn’t rigid enough?” I asked Simon. – “No, Mom, don’t you remember? That was Chapter 9 about Fourier Transform! And the Navier-Stokes equations was Chapter 10!” – “Oh, and the Fourier Transform was also the one where there was a lot about the violin string, right?” – “No!”, – Simon really laughs at me by now, – “That was in Chapter 8, about the Wave Function! You keep being one chapter behind in everything you say!” Simon honestly finds it hilarious how I can’t seem to retain the information about all of these equations after reading it once. I love his laugh, even when he’s laughing at me.

Today though, he was weeping inconsolably and there was nothing I could do. Daniel Shiffman had to cancel the live session about CFD, computer fluid dynamics. Simon had been waiting impatiently for this stream. My guess, because it’s his favourite teacher talking about something interesting from a purely mathematical view, a cocktail of all things he enjoys most. And because he never seems to be able to postpone the joy of learning. He had explained to me once that if he has this drive inside of him to conduct a certain experiment or watch a certain tutorial now, he simply can’t wait, because later he doesn’t seem to get the same kick out of it anymore.

I’m baking Simon’s favourite apple pie to pep him up. Here are a couple more screen shots of him taking part in the Wednesday lesson:

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Simon and Daniel Shiffman

Today is one of the most beautiful days in Simon’s life: NYU Associate Professor and the creator of Coding Train Daniel Shiffman has been Simon’s guarding angel, role model and source of all the knowledge Simon has accumulated so far (in programming, math, community ethics and English), and today Simon got to meet him for the first time in real life!

Daniel Shiffman posted: