Creative Coding Utrecht MeetUp

What a blissful day at Creative Coding Utrecht! Simon also got a chance to show a few of his projects in Processing to a cool and understanding audience!

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The Senses: Simulating Taste and Smell

You need 24 bits (8 bytes) to simulate color. That’s 24 ones and zeros. How many bits are necessary to simulate taste? Or smell?

Correction: You would need 584 bits to express smell, not 654 (Simon made a mistake in the original calculation).

The Senses: What color is the dress?

A couple of years ago this dress went viral on the internet as some people argued it was blue and black and others saw white and golden. To this day neuroscientists haven’t found an explanation to this. Simon analysed the actual colors as they appear on the screen using the ShareX app. So what color is the dress?

Optical Illusions in Processing (Java)

Simon created three optical illusions in Processing (Java) playing with color. For better effect, you can download Simon’s code on GitHub: https://github.com/simon-tiger/colorIllusions

The Part 1 video is about the first two illusions. The third (and the coolest) illusion is in Part 2.

 

Simon writes:
Illusion 1: A checkerboard with blue and yellow squares, but if you move away from it, you see white.
Illusion 2
Mode 1: A disk with red and green, but when you spin it, it becomes yellow.
Mode 2: A disk with red and cyan, but when you spin it, it disappears.
Illusion 3: A rainbow of colors, but when you pause it from flickering, you only see red, green, and blue.

If Illusion 2 Mode 2 doesn’t work, change the background from 255 to between 128 and 135.
If any of the other illusions don’t work, try doing them on a different screen.

Inspired by Physics Girl videos.

 

 

Observing the Red Moon during the eclipse last Friday night

We were also lucky to have friends with a telescope over at Simon’s grandma’s summer house in Friesland last weekend and saw the Moon a little closer than as shown on these mobile phone pics I took. It was very warm and great to be outside at midnight after many hours in the train on the melting railroad (the train couldn’t move for one and a half hours due to the switches malfunctioning in the heat).

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Simon watching Daniel Shiffman’s live stream on Machine Learning outside:

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Simon’s Archimedean Solids Project

https://youtu.be/dYBZXFW4bsg

Simon is working on a project that will involve constructing the Archimedean solids from paper pieces that he programs in Processing (Java) and prints out. In the previous video, Simon worked out the distance between two points to measure the side length of a pentagon that has the radius of 1 (i.e. the distance between its adjacent vertices if the distance from its center to its vertices is 1). He first made a mistake in his calculation and got a result that would be true for a hexagon, not a pentagon. He then corrected himself and got the value that he thought he could use in the Processing code, but as it turned out, the ratio between the radius and the side length was still not right. We recorded a whole new video full of calculations and playing with the code, and achieved pretty neat results after Simon used the new value in the code, but still not good enough, as Simon wanted to have his pentagons to have the side length of 40 (to match the triangles and the squares he’d already made). Simon later found a solution using a different formula for a polygon with n sides (from trigonometry, defining the radius as the side length over (2sin times 180/n)) and succeeded in getting exactly the pentagons he wanted, with the side equalling 40. See the result here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f4unEptU3Vs&t=1s

The winning formula:

If you are really into working out the calculations, feel free to check out our frantic attempts here:

https://youtu.be/TuVqc5A08es

Live Stream #18. Living Code, Chapter 6: Particle Systems. 99 Balls Game.

Simon says: “In this live session, I am continuing Chapter 6 of my “Living Code” Course. This is the 4th live stream that I’m attempting to do this”. It was a tough one again, many thanks to Nahuel José for helping Simon out with an error! In the end Simon did manage to finish the second video in Particle Systems, but got another error in his third video in this chapter, so please feel free to help out if you have a minute to look at his code: https://alpha.editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/HJK_bEjCf

Simon also started working on a “99 Balls” game. The next stream will be in two weeks, on July 24!