Community Projects, Contributing, Math Riddles, Math Tricks, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book

Simon having fun solving math puzzles on Twitter.

While in Southern France, Simon really enjoyed solving this puzzle (he originally saw in a Brilliant.org vid). He was so happy with his solution he kept drawing it out on paper and in digital apps, and later shared the puzzle on Twitter. This sparked quite a few reactions from fellow math lovers, encouraged Brilliant to tweet new puzzles and now Brilliant follows Simon on Twitter, how cool is that!

Community Projects, Computer Science, Group, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life

Simon introducing himself for the World Science Scholars program

This is Simon’s introductory video for the World Science Scholars program (initiative of The World Science Festival). In May this year, Simon has been chosen as one of the 30 young students worldwide, joining the 2019 cohort for exceptional talents in mathematics. Most of the other students are 14 to 17 years old, age was not a factor in the selection process. To help the students and their future mentors to get to know one another, every World Science Scholar was asked to record an introductory video, no longer than 3 minutes, answering a few questions such as what is the biggest misconception about math, what your favourite branches of math and science are and who among the living mathematicians you’d like to meet.

Throughout the program, the students are given access to over a dozen unique interdisciplinary online courses and have the option to complete an applied math project, alone or as a team, consulting real experts in the field of their project. Simon has already started the first course module, on Special Relativity by Professor Brian Greene. The course has been specifically recorded for the World Science Scholars and reflects the program’s ethos: it’s self-paced, no grades, it relies on beautiful animations and visualizations, it’s full of subtle humour, is dynamic, thought-provoking and quite advanced (exactly in TheĀ Goldilocks Zone for Simon, as far as I could judge), yet broken up into easy-to-digest pieces. It’s difficult to predict how Simon’s path as a World Science Scholar will unfold (I’m afraid of making any predictions as he is extremely autodidact), but so far we have been very pleased with the nature of this program and it seems to match our non-coercive, self-directed learning style. I have especially liked one of the course’s main postulates: “Simultaneity is in the eye of the beholder”.

Simon watching Brian Greene’s Special Relativity course
Studying light clocks
Light clocks. Does the moving light clock tick slower?
Simon thinking about the question: Does the moving light clock tick slower?
Coding, Community Projects, Contributing, Notes on everyday life, Python, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code, Together with sis

Drawing with Turtle

Here we are, on the day of my 40th birthday, while recording a lesson of drawing with turtle in Python. It was meant to be my birthday present, a beginner-friendly hour of code, in which Neva would also be able to take an active part. We ended up recording two beautiful sessions only to find out later that our screen capture video was irreparably corrupted (never record in mp4 in OBS). Simon was inconsolable. We also thought this webcam recording was gone but rediscovered it a day later. So nice to have it as a memory.

And I’m relieved to say that we have managed to redo the whole project from scratch today (sadly without Neva’s participation this time as she had better things to do, so I look rather redundant sitting there next to Simon giving the lesson). Once Simon is done with the editing (which is another two days of work I’m afraid), he will upload the hour of code on YouTube. He also plans to create a website for this project to enable his “students” to draw in a built-in application.

From our session today:

And here is an example of Simon drawing with turtle for his own pleasure, a Serpinski triangle in Python (a few days ago):

Coding, Community Projects, Computer Science, Contributing, JavaScript, Milestones, Notes on everyday life, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code

Simon’s new “giant project”: Sorting Visualizations

this video sums up more than one week of hard work

Simon writes: I’ve built a giant project; a website / community project / platform for making algorithms! I’ve built in this video Bubble Sort, Selection Sort, Insertion Sort, Mergesort, Quicksort, Heapsort, Shell Sort and Radix Sort. So I’m done with the sorting part of the project. In the next video I’ll show you the making of the Pathfinding part of the project, and then, I’m going to put it on GitHub, and pass it on to the community, to put more algorithms on there, and even new types of algorithms!

Play with Simon’s visualizations on Repl.it at: https://repl.it/@simontiger/SortingImproved

Simon’s tweet about the project

Simon has already recorded a series of video tutorials about sorting algorithms earlier this spring. In the videos, he codes on his RaspberryPi, but here are the links to the Python code available on his GitHub page: Parts 1 – 5; Parts 6 – 7.

Coding, Community Projects, Computer Science, Contributing, JavaScript, Murderous Maths, Physics, Simon's Own Code, Simon's sketch book

Simon’s Community Contribution: Variation of 2D Casting Coding Challenge in p5.js

This is Simon’s version of Daniel Shiffman’s 2D Casting code, made on Wednesday last week right after the live session. Link to the live session including the coding challenge.

Code and interactive animation are online at: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/ugHX4yKQC
Play with the animation online at:
https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/present/ugHX4yKQC
https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/full/ugHX4yKQC

Simon’s suggestions during a patron-only live session yesterday
a screenshot of Simon’s community contribution published on the Coding Train website

Simon has also made one more, optimized version of this project (with fewer rays, runs faster): https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/present/F6TCHAZs_
https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/F6TCHAZs_

Both of Simon’s versions have been added to the community contributions on the Coding Train website: https://thecodingtrain.com/CodingChallenges/145-2d-ray-casting.html

screenshot of the optimized version
Coding, Community Projects, Computer Science, Contributing, Geometry Joys, Group, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life

More examples of Simon’s chat contributions on math and coding

Simon is always extremely active in the discussions about the current projects made by/ lectures given by NYU’s Asdociate Professor Daniel Shiffman during his live sessions on the Coding Train channel. He also enjoys “initiating discussions” among the channel’s patrons (grown-up programmers) and Daniel. “Mom, the discussion I initiated is still going on!” I couldn’t possibly post all the coding and math comments/ suggestions that Simon makes in the chats on YouTube, Slack and GitHub (and I don’t believe I should either), but every now and then, I like collecting samples of Simon’s contributing to the discussion:

Simon contributing to a discussion prior to a live session on ray tracing
Simon contributing to Daniel Shiffman’s tutorial on the computational geometry “minimum spanning tree” problem

The small font above says:

Correction: The MST problem does not allow any loops (like A->B, B->C, C->D, D->A again.) So the solution at 2:30 is wrong! In fact, _no wonder it does that_, because Prim’s Algorithm will never find a loop. Here’s why:

Let’s suppose that it could find a loop (let’s say, a loop of 4, so A->B, B->C, C->D, D->A again, but this argument would work the same each way.) Ok, so it will start from A, and mark it as reached. It will check A against B, C and D, find B, and mark B as reached. Then, it will check A against C and D, and B against C and D. and it will find that it should connect B and C, and mark C as reached. Then, it will check A, B and C all against D, and find that it should connect C and D, and mark D as reached. But now, we reach a problem. It will not connect D and A, because both are already reached!

Why was it designed like that? Because that’s what the problem says! It’s a Minimum Spanning _Tree_, so it can’t have any loops.

So there you go, that’s why Prim’s algorithm will not find a loop.

Coding, Coding Everywhere, Community Projects, Contributing, Crafty, Geometry Joys, Group, Java, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code, Together with sis, Trips

Simon speaking at the Processing Community Day in Amsterdam

Simon had his first public performance in front of a large audience last Saturday (February 9, 2019): he spoke about his Times Tables Visualization project at the Processing Community Day in Amsterdam!

Simon speaking at Processing Community Day Amsterdam

Simon writes: You can access the code of the poster and the animation (and the logo for my upcoming company!) and download the presentation in PowerPoint, on GitHub at https://github.com/simon-tiger/times_tables

If you’d like to buy a printed copy of the poster, please contact me and I’ll send you one. Status: 3 LEFT.

One of the tweets about Simon’s presentation
Simon next to his poster after the presentation
Working on his presentation the day before
Waiting to speak
Experimenting with other projects at the community day
At the entrance to the venue, with the poster still packed
There was a lot of interest in Simon’s project
Coding, Community Projects, Contributing, JavaScript, live stream, Machine Learning, Milestones, Murderous Maths, neural networks, Notes on everyday life, Set the beautiful mind free, Simon teaching, Trips

Simon took part in a Coding Train livestream in Paris!

Simon and Daniel Shiffman after the livestream

The video below is part of Daniel Shiffman’s livestream hosted by GROW Le Tank in Paris on 6 January 2019 about KNN, machine learning, transfer learning and image recognition. Daniel kindly allowed Simon to take the stage for a few minutes to make a point about image compression (the algorithm that Daniel used was sort of a compression algorithm):

Here is a different recording (in two parts) of the same moment from a different angle:


Community Projects, Crafty, Discovering Antwerpen, Geometry Joys, Math Riddles, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Simon's sketch book

Maths Jam in May

What a blissful atmosphere at Maths Jam Antwerp yesterday, full of respect, encouragement and acceptance. It’s an international monthly meet-up taking place every second to last Tuesday of the month, simultaneously at many locations in the world, three hours of maths fun! This was Simon’s first time. He solved two difficult geometry problems and showed some of his current work to the math enthusiasts who attended. Was hopping and giggling all the way home.