Taking part in Daniel Shiffman’s live coding class

This is how happy a child can be while taking a class:

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Simon made his own speech library: Speechjs

Simon has just finished working on his first library,  a #speechlibrary Speechjs. You can find Simon’s library on GitHub: https://github.com/simon-tiger/speechjs

Simon also added a reference page at: https://github.com/simon-tiger/speechjs/wiki/Reference

You can use this library for any project that uses #speechrecognition and/or speech synthesis. Simon has put it under the MIT (permissive) license, to make sure everyone can use it for free, he emphasized.

While writing the library, Simon also recycled various code he found online, but essentially this library is his own code. He calls the library “just a layer on top of the web speech API” (that means you’re limited to what your browser supports).

 

Simon writing a Matter.js textbook

Simon is currently working on a “Matter.js textbook”, a set of tutorials on how to use Matter.js (a physics library) that he writes on GitHub. Simon writes everything himself, not copying from anywhere. Sometimes he forgets some coding syntax and looks it up in the documentation, but for the rest this is his own text. He explains: “The reason why I am making this textbook is because there are Matter.js tutorials but they are really short and there aren’t many of them. And the only video tutorials are by Daniel Shiffman and they are using P5.js.” If it proves possible, Simon might add video to his GitHub textbook later.

It’s great to observe him type away and when I look over his shoulder, I see that he makes very decent sentences, with a nice tint of humour every now and then.

The link to the textbook:

https://github.com/simon-tiger/matter-js-tutorial/blob/master/README.md

Simon contributes to the p5.Speech library

Simon has made a pull request to the p5.Speech GitHub repo (a milestone!) and hopes his request gets merged. In this video he explains what he wants to improve with his contribution.

Later it turned out that someone else made a similar request (with more extras) and that request will probably be merged, so Simon was definitely thinking in the right derection. He got positive response from Daniel Shiffman and it looked like Simon’s comments have sparked a discussion on GitHub.

 

Simon contrubuted to p5.Speech library. Pull request 14 Oct 2017

Simon writing on GitHub: 

This github issue is referring to pull request #7.

As you can see in commit a2a5d38, there are some comments. Which look like 
this:

// this one 'start' cycle.  if you need to recognize speech more

// than once, use continuous mode rather than firing start()

// multiple times in a single script.

The comments are right before the start() function in the p5.SpeechRec 
object. But the commit adds arguments to this function:

p5.SpeechRec.prototype.start = function(continuous, interimResults) {

  if('webkitSpeechRecognition' in window) {

    this.rec.continuous = continuous;

    this.rec.interimResults = interimResults;

    this.rec.start();

  }

}

And before, that piece of code looked like this:

p5.SpeechRec.prototype.start = function() {

  if('webkitSpeechRecognition' in window) {

    this.rec.continuous = this.continuous;

    this.rec.interimResults = this.interimResults;

    this.rec.start();

  }

}

Are the comments "unnecessary" now? In other words, Should we remove 
them or leave them there?