Creative Coding Utrecht MeetUp

What a blissful day at Creative Coding Utrecht! Simon also got a chance to show a few of his projects in Processing to a cool and understanding audience!

Sugar and Salt

Want some me sugar in your tea?

Simon built this sucrose (table sugar) molecule with the help of Theodore Gray’s Molecules book (although he is pretty sure there is a mistake in the Dutch version of the book, on a different page, where the fructose, glucose and galactose molecular structures seem to be mixed up – the sucrose description helped him discover this as the table sugar molecule is made up of one fructose and one glucose molecule).

Simon is also fascinated how sugar and salt, substances that are easy to confuse on the kitchen table, are made of molecules that are so “wildly different”:

Simon and Daniel Shiffman

Today is one of the most beautiful days in Simon’s life: NYU Associate Professor and the creator of Coding Train Daniel Shiffman has been Simon’s guarding angel, role model and source of all the knowledge Simon has accumulated so far (in programming, math, community ethics and English), and today Simon got to meet him for the first time in real life!

Daniel Shiffman posted:

Simon’s Decision Tree Library

Simon has just created a decision tree library, called “Decision”, that is helpful in building decision trees/forests (Machine Learning). He has also tried performing unit tests for the first time, and passed several of them! Once Simon’s library is in GitHub he also plans to link it to the testing hub CircleCI so that no merging can happen without passing tests. In this video, Simon explains what a decision tree is, shows his library and his test decision trees.

Simon’s library on GitHub (with a huge Readme that Simon wrote himself): https://github.com/simon-tiger/decision

Simon’s library on CircleCI: https://circleci.com/gh/simon-tiger/decision/3

Simon’s unit tests:

Screen Shot 2018-02-20 at 16.59.12

Simon made his own speech library: Speechjs

Simon has just finished working on his first library,  a #speechlibrary Speechjs. You can find Simon’s library on GitHub: https://github.com/simon-tiger/speechjs

Simon also added a reference page at: https://github.com/simon-tiger/speechjs/wiki/Reference

You can use this library for any project that uses #speechrecognition and/or speech synthesis. Simon has put it under the MIT (permissive) license, to make sure everyone can use it for free, he emphasized.

While writing the library, Simon also recycled various code he found online, but essentially this library is his own code. He calls the library “just a layer on top of the web speech API” (that means you’re limited to what your browser supports).

 

Simon writing a Matter.js textbook

Simon is currently working on a “Matter.js textbook”, a set of tutorials on how to use Matter.js (a physics library) that he writes on GitHub. Simon writes everything himself, not copying from anywhere. Sometimes he forgets some coding syntax and looks it up in the documentation, but for the rest this is his own text. He explains: “The reason why I am making this textbook is because there are Matter.js tutorials but they are really short and there aren’t many of them. And the only video tutorials are by Daniel Shiffman and they are using P5.js.” If it proves possible, Simon might add video to his GitHub textbook later.

It’s great to observe him type away and when I look over his shoulder, I see that he makes very decent sentences, with a nice tint of humour every now and then.

The link to the textbook:

https://github.com/simon-tiger/matter-js-tutorial/blob/master/README.md

Simon contributes to the p5.Speech library

Simon has made a pull request to the p5.Speech GitHub repo (a milestone!) and hopes his request gets merged. In this video he explains what he wants to improve with his contribution.

Later it turned out that someone else made a similar request (with more extras) and that request will probably be merged, so Simon was definitely thinking in the right derection. He got positive response from Daniel Shiffman and it looked like Simon’s comments have sparked a discussion on GitHub.

 

Simon contrubuted to p5.Speech library. Pull request 14 Oct 2017

Simon writing on GitHub: 

This github issue is referring to pull request #7.

As you can see in commit a2a5d38, there are some comments. Which look like 
this:

// this one 'start' cycle.  if you need to recognize speech more

// than once, use continuous mode rather than firing start()

// multiple times in a single script.

The comments are right before the start() function in the p5.SpeechRec 
object. But the commit adds arguments to this function:

p5.SpeechRec.prototype.start = function(continuous, interimResults) {

  if('webkitSpeechRecognition' in window) {

    this.rec.continuous = continuous;

    this.rec.interimResults = interimResults;

    this.rec.start();

  }

}

And before, that piece of code looked like this:

p5.SpeechRec.prototype.start = function() {

  if('webkitSpeechRecognition' in window) {

    this.rec.continuous = this.continuous;

    this.rec.interimResults = this.interimResults;

    this.rec.start();

  }

}

Are the comments "unnecessary" now? In other words, Should we remove 
them or leave them there?