Magformers Pythagoras set

Simon pulled out his old Magformers Pythagoras set and this time around, he really nailed all the tasks independently. The set offers a variety of puzzles to “prove” the Pythagorean theorem and apply it to other shapes (even 3D!), as well as teaches several more tricks (such as the ratios between the areas of similar triangles or the areas of parallelograms).

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Chinese square Proof:

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Area of Parallelograms:

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Applying Pythagorean theorem to other shapes:

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Extended theorem by the Greek mathematician Pappus:

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Areas of Similar Triangles:

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More of Pythagorean theorem with various shapes:

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Puzzles:

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Simon contributed his own cloud for the Processing Community Day

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In the video below, Simon is showing the cloud design he contributed to the community project collecting cloud designs for the Processing Community Day coming up on October 21, 2017. You can play with Simon’s design on the community project webpage created by Coding Train at https://codingtrain.github.io/CommunityClouds/

Simon’s cloud is called “Round Cloud”. Once you open it on the Coding Train Community Clouds page, the cloud changes its shape every time you click on it.

Where are my compasses?

 

There’s been a lot of drawing going on here lately. And jokes, like in the video above. Yesterday, after he got distracted while trying to draw the exact tangent of a circle, Simon said: “I went off on another tangent. To find a tangent!”

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The Magformers saga continued

Oops, the Magformers are back in our life. I thought that Simon was over Magformers (which he built with excessively when he was six), but he has picked them up again and taken them to a new level. He seems to be using Magformers to illustrate his increasingly philosophical thoughts in the pauses he takes between lessons and programming. Yesterday, he was quite disturbed after building with the mirror piece for a while and said: “What if two mirrors reflect each other? Would that stop time?” He added: “Just for safety, I’m going to put the mirror in the box. Never, never ever put two mirrors opposite to each other!”

And there is more! Magformers the company has actually contacted Simon on his YouTube channel, saying they loved his Magformers Table program he made in JavaScript and wanted Simon to send them an e-mail and to talk to him about it! Simon put his code on GitHub and shared it, you can view his Magformers Table online here:

https://simon-tiger.github.io/magtables/magtable/

He hasn’t made it interactive yet though. This was the original plan but he got stuck.

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Simon’s Superellipse tutorial on Thimble

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Simon has created a beautiful little website with a tutorial (that he wrote completely on his own, from scratch) on how to build a superellipse in JavaScript.

Here is the  link: https://thimbleprojects.org/simontiger/315031/

(it’s on this new thimble.mozilla.org online code editor)

What specially delights me about Simon’s works lately is the subtle sense of humour he writes with (probably acquired through both watching Daniel Shiffman’s videos and reading Murderous Math books):

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The project isn’t finished yet as the example Simon is linking to the website is only for an ellipse and a superellipse yet:

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Simon also plans to add other shapes to the website later.

 

Circle-Rectangle Intersection (Collision)

Simon has been studying  various 2D collisions (via the p5.collide2D library and paulbourke.net), especially the Circle-Rectangle Intersection (Collision). He was so busy with this problem that he even put it down in chalk at the playground:

 

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And on the whiteboard at home:

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And spent nearly his entire math lesson today talking about the math behind 2D object collision to his math teacher:

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Simon also used Circle-Rectangle Collision for his awesome new Hero Game in Processing!