Contributing, Group, Math Riddles, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Set the beautiful mind free, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book

MathsJam Antwerp 20 November 2019. A Blast and a Responsibility.

Today, Simon returned to a problem he first encountered at a MathsJam in summer: “Pick random numbers between 0 and 1, until the sum exceeds 1. What is the expected number of numbers you’ll pick?” Back in June, Simon already knew the answer was e, but his attempt to prove it didn’t quite work back then. Today, he managed to prove his answer!

The same proof in a more concise way:

At MathsJam last night, Simon was really eager to show his proof to Rudi Penne, a professor from the University of Antwerp who was sitting next to Simon last time he gave it a go back in June. Rudi kept Simon’s notes and told me he really admired the way Simon’s reasoning spans borders between subjects (the way Simon can start with combinatorics and jump to geometry), something that many students nurtured within the structured subject system are incapable of doing, Rudi said. Who needs borders?

Later the same evening, Simon had a blast demonstrating the proof to a similar problem to a larger grateful and patient audience, including Professor David Eelbode. The first proof was Simon’s own, the second problem (puzzle with a shrinking bullseye) and proof came from Grant Sanderson (3Blue1Brown) on Numberphile.

“Don’t allow any constraints to dull his excitement and motivation!” Rudi told me as Simon was waiting for us to leave. “That’s a huge responsibility you’ve got there, in front of the world”.

Contributing, English and Text-Based Data, Lingua franca, Milestones, Notes on everyday life, Together with sis

Simon edits his sisters vlog and does the subtitles

Simon’s sister Neva has started a vlog and Simon, busy as he is, enjoys editing her videos. For the first 17-minute video he has also done all the subtitles (translating from Dutch to English), which was a project that took him two days and something like 7 hours of work! Neva, in her turn, has got Simon increasingly interested in environmental issues.

Simon doing the subtitles
If you could choose, when woud you like to live – now, in the past or in the future? This poetic portrait of what the new generation thinks about the future climate is a spontaneous talk that Oxiea Villamonte (Royal Art Academy of Antwerp) and her young friend Neva Houben (8) have recorded while taking a walk by the river.
Group, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Set the beautiful mind free, Simon teaching, Together with sis

Social encounters

Such a pleasant play date last week with another eager learner. Simon shared his GeoGebra skills and some geometrical paper tricks, among other things. It’s heartwarming to see Simon blossom socially, he is growingly attentive to younger kids and generally engaging with people of various ages, as long as they show interest in anything Simon has an understanding of.

Biology, Computer Science, Geography, Group, In the Media, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Physics, Trips

World Science Scholars Feature Simon’s visit to CERN in a newsletter. The current course is about neurons. Reading Stephen Wolfram.

Simon’s September visit to CERN has been featured in a World Science Scholars newsletter:

Here’s our update on the World Science Scholars program. Simon has finished the first bootcamp course on the theory and quantum mechanics by one of program’s founders, string theorist Professor Brian Greene and has taken part in three live sessions: with Professor Brian Greene, Professor Justin Khoury (dark matter research, alternatives to the inflationary paradigm, such as the Ekpyrotic Universe), and Professor Barry Barish (one of the leading experts in gravitational waves and particle detectors; won the Nobel Prize in Physics along with Rainer Weiss and Kip Thorne “for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves”).

September 2019: Simon at a hotel room in Geneva taking pat in his first WSS live session, with Professor Brian Greene
September 2019: screenshot from Professor Brian Greene’s course module on quantum physics

At the moment, there isn’t much going on. Simon is following the second course offered by the program, at his own pace. It’s a course about neurology and neurological statistics by Professor Suzana Herculano-Houzel and is called “Big Brains, Small Brains: The Conundrum of Comparing Brains and Intelligence”. The course is compiled from Professor Herculano-Houzel’s presentations made at the World Science Festival so it doesn’t seem to have been recorded specifically for the scholars, like Professor Brian Greene’s course was.

Professor Herculano-Houzel has made “brain soup” (also called “isotropic fractionator”) out of dozens of animal species and has counted exactly how many neurons different brains are made of. Contrary to what Simon saw in Professor Greene’s course (mainly already familiar stuff as both relativity theory and quantum mechanics have been within his area of interest for quite some time), most of the material in this second course is very new to him. And possibly also less exciting. Although what helps is the mathematical way in which the data is presented. After all, the World Science Scholars program is about interdisciplinary themes that are intertwined with mathematical thinking.

Screenshots of the course’s quizzes. Simon has learned about scale invariance, the number of neurons in the human brain, allometric and isometric scaling relationships.

Another mathematical example: in Professor Herculano-Houzel’s course on brains we have witnessed nested patterns, as if they escaped from Stephen Wolfram’s book we’re reading now.

screenshot from the course by Professor Herculano-Houzel

Simon has also contributed to the discussion pages, trying out an experiment where paper surface represented cerebral cortex:

The top paper represents the cerebral cortex of a smaller animal. Cerebral cortex follows the same physical laws when folding is applied.

Simon: “Humans are not outliers because they’re outliers, they are outliers because there’s a hidden variable”.

screenshot from Professor Herculano-Houzel’s course: after colour has been added to the plot, the patterns reveal themselves

Simon is looking forward to Stephen Wolfram’s course (that he is recording for world science scholars) and, of course, to the live sessions with him. The information that Stephen Wolfram will be the next lecturer has stimulated Simon to dive deep into his writings (we are already nearly 400 pages through his “bible” A New Kind of Science) and sparked a renewed and more profound understanding of cellular automata and Turing machines and of ways to connect those to our observations in nature. I’m pretty sure this is just the beginning.

It’s amazing to observe how quickly Simon grasps the concepts described in A New Kind of Science; on several occasions he has tried to recreate the examples he read about the night before.

Simon playing around in Wolfram Mathematica, after reading about minor changes to the initial conditions of an idealised version of the kneading process
Simon working out a “study plan” for his Chinese lessons using a network system model he saw in Stephen Wolfram’s book “A New Kind of Science”
Coding, Community Projects, JavaScript, Milestones, Simon makes gamez, Simon's Own Code

Simon’s Math Games in p5.js

Simon loves the Maths Is Fun website and has borrowed a couple of ideas for cool games from there. He wrote the code completely on his own, from scratch. Below is a video where he presents his Connect games:

Published on October 30, 2019

I’ve gone Connect Crazy!
This project is inspired by MathsIsFun, which has a lot of variations on the classic game Connect Four, the code is entirely mine.
Classic Game of Connect Four: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/full/TISsTqZ8D
And then I’ve made Connect Three: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/full/c30Oqd4Qf
And Connect Five: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/full/I6Digth0A
Then I’ve also made a version called Drop, where if the bottom row fills up, the whole board drops down one row:
https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/full/Ysu2yvh1x
https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/full/gb3gVSd5K

screen shot of Simon’s Connect 5 game

Another game Simon built was Bulls and Cows (trying to guess a sequence of letters): https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/full/3bC9j3501 Link to Simon’s code: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/3bC9j3501

Yet another one was a Reaction Time test! You can test your reaction time by clicking anywhere on the screen as soon as the circle changes color: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/full/Gzv094mgzM Link to Simon’s code: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/Gzv094mgzM

screenshot of the Reaction Test

And last but not least, an unfinished project of building a Checkers game:

screenshot of Simon’s yet unfinished Checkers game sketch

Experiments, Milestones, Physics, Electronics, Engineering

More Engineering. RAM Ready in the simulated 8-bit computer project in Circuitverse.

In October and early November, Simon was busy with another attempt to simulate SAP-1 (simple as possible processor, an 8-bit computer) in Circuitverse (something that he hadn’t managed to complete when he tried it last time). I’m not even sure if anyone uses Circuitverse for such large-scale projects.

Main

On November 7, Simon finally managed to finish the RAM on his simulated 8-bit computer (a computer where every general-purpose register contains 8 bits and therefore can only process 8 bits of data)! Although he is far from the end of the project, he is convinced that the RAM is the hardest part, so “now everything is going to be okay!”

“RAM was the hardest mainly because I have been trying to build the subcircuit for the RAM myself, which is not going to do it for SAP-2”,(Simon’s next ambition, also an 8-bit computer but with 64K memory, 2K PROM + 62K RAM). “This time the RAM I needed was particularly small, so I built a mini-RAM myself”.

The most difficult part, half of the mini-RAM. It doesn’t contain 16 bites, it contains 16 4-bit words or “nibbles” of memory

You can view and launch this (unfinished) project via this link: https://circuitverse.org/users/7241/projects/35775

All of Simon’s projects on his Circuitverse page: https://circuitverse.org/users/7241

Simon’s current plan is to record a series of videos based on the Digital Computer Electronics book he uses as a guide in his engineering projects.

Simon compiling a plan (in Microsoft Paint) based on the Digital Computer Electronics book contents

These are some simpler circuits from late September, simulated on Tinkercad:

Test circuit in Tinkercad on 30 September 2019
Test circuit in Tinkercad on 30 September 2019
JK Flipflop to create simple clock module in Tinkercad on 30 September 2019
Coding, Community Projects, Contributing, Experiments, JavaScript, live stream, Machine Learning, Milestones, Physics, Simon's Own Code

Simon’s Random Number Generator

This one’s back from mid-October, forgot to post here.

Simon created a random number generator that generates a frequency, and then picks it back up. Then, it calculates the error between the generated frequency and the picked up frequency. This is one of my community contributions for a Coding Train challenge: https://thecodingtrain.com/CodingChallenges/151-ukulele-tuner.html

Link to project: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/eOXdkP7tz
Link to the random number plots: https://www.wolframcloud.com/env/monajune0/ukalele%20tuner%20generated%20random%20number%20analysis.nb
Link to Daniel Shiffman’s live stream featured at the beginning of this vid: https://youtu.be/jKHgVdyC55M

plot of the random numbers generated by Simon’s ukulele tuner random number generator (plotted in Wolfram Mathematica)
Coding, Contributing, JavaScript, Milestones, Simon makes gamez

Make 24 with Teachable Machine in p5, ml5.

Simon has worked really hard for several days on his first machine learning community contribution! He has created this mini-series about building a game of Make 24 with Google’s Teachable Machine that he trained to recognise gestures as a game controller.

“It’s the first time I’m using ml5 from scratch! I’ve also built in a feature to enable the users to train their own models!”

Link to my ml5 project: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/full/McNY2_ay_
Code: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/McNY2_ay_

Link to my game of Make 24 without ml5/Teachable Machine: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/full/qH_ZSvup5
Code: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/qH_ZSvup5

Simon has devoted this project to his friend, photographer Oxiea Villamonte who is turning 24 next week!
Math and Computer Science Everywhere, Milestones, Murderous Maths

Simon’s Cycle Formula

During Chinese lesson yesterday, Simon came up with what he calls his “Cycle formula” to calculate all the permutations of placing n numbers in a cyclical order (like on a clock face). He also proved the formula. Wait, Chinese lesson? Yes, I know, this guy manages to squeeze some math everywhere. His Chinese tutor loved it by the way. “Well, we’ve both learned something!” Simon exclaimed delightfully.

the formula is (n-1)!
Computer Science, Contributing, Group, Logic, Math and Computer Science Everywhere, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life

Brilliant Discussions

This is an example of the learning style that Simon enjoys most. He really likes doing the daily challenges on Brilliant.org. He later sometimes discusses them with other participants or even writes wikis!

Simon writing an explanation on Brilliant.org’s discussion page about a Computer Science Fundamentals daily challenge. Link to the full discussion: https://brilliant.org/daily-problems/what-variable-1/
The problem and Simon’s answer
Simon’s contribution to the discussion