Archemedes Puzzle

Simon showing the Archimedes puzzle he made himself to his Russian grandmom. Archimedes had created a colorless version of this puzzle, but Simon decided to add colors and use the Four Color Theorem (stating that any map is possible to color with four or fewer colors without two identical colors being adjacent) to help himself solve this murderously challenging puzzle.

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From Platonic Solids to Archimedean Solids

Simon explains how to to turn Platonic Solids into Archimedean Solids, using truncation and rectification.

 

Simon explains how to convert Platonic Solids to Archimedean Solids and builds a Rhombicosidodecahedron from 62 Magformers pieces.

 

Magformers did not sponsor these videos. In fact, we’ve been sponsoring Magformers 🙂

The Snowball Throwing Game in Processing

Simon invented this fun game in Processing after he and his little sister had some proper winter fun outdoors in the fresh December snow (quite rare for the local climate and thus immensely cherished by the little people). The game is about throwing  snowballs in such a trajectory that they stick to one another, forming a super-snowball. After I finished filming this, the two snowball throwers had such a great time with the game that I dare say the giggling effect from of this 2D simulation overshadowed the real snowball fight that had originally inspired it. They did love playing in the real snow on the next day though, until it melted away.

 

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Ă  quatre mains

Here is Simon playing à quatre mains with his little sis, something he loves doing since she started piano lessons. She is not very keen on taking instructions, which upsets Simon enormously at times, but once they find the right tempo together, our whole world fills up with most beautiful vibes, making their loving friendship even more special.

The Magformers saga continued

Oops, the Magformers are back in our life. I thought that Simon was over Magformers (which he built with excessively when he was six), but he has picked them up again and taken them to a new level. He seems to be using Magformers to illustrate his increasingly philosophical thoughts in the pauses he takes between lessons and programming. Yesterday, he was quite disturbed after building with the mirror piece for a while and said: “What if two mirrors reflect each other? Would that stop time?” He added: “Just for safety, I’m going to put the mirror in the box. Never, never ever put two mirrors opposite to each other!”

And there is more! Magformers the company has actually contacted Simon on his YouTube channel, saying they loved his Magformers Table program he made in JavaScript and wanted Simon to send them an e-mail and to talk to him about it! Simon put his code on GitHub and shared it, you can view his Magformers Table online here:

https://simon-tiger.github.io/magtables/magtable/

He hasn’t made it interactive yet though. This was the original plan but he got stuck.

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