Geometry Joys, Math and Computer Science Everywhere, Math Tricks, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book

Sums of consecutive numbers

While waiting to pick his little sister up from a ballet class, Simon explaining general algebraic formulas to calculate the sums of consecutive numbers. He derives the formulas from drawing the numbers as dots forming certain geometric chapes.
consecutive integers
consecutive odd integers
Geography, history, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Museum Time, Notes on everyday life, Physics, Together with sis, Trips

Surrounded by the equations that changed the world

At the main entrance to CERN there is an impressive smooth curve of a memorial to the world’s most important equations and scientific discoveries:

Simon pointing to the Fourier transform function
Computer Science, Murderous Maths, Simon's sketch book

The most efficient base

I’ve discovered that base 3 is the most efficient base (not base 2). Actually the most efficient base is e, and 3 is the closest to e (the proof requires Calculus).

South Korea has published a complete design of a ternary computer in July 2019! So this is actually cutting edge material here!

(Inefficiency is calculated by multiplying the number of digits by the base number).

Simon has also showed me a trick to translate any number into binary using a grid:

using acorns instead of pebbles

and a card trick based on quickly translating a number into binary in his head:

Crafty, Geometry Joys, Good Reads, Logic, Murderous Maths, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book

Attractiveness vs. Personality

Debunking the stereotype that all attractive guys/girls are mean, something Simon has learned from MajorPrep and the How Not to Be Wrong book by Jordan Ellenberg. The slope in dark blue pen shows our scope of attention, a pretty narrow part of the actually diverse field of choices.
Group, In the Media, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Set the beautiful mind free

The Netherlands Chase Away Extreme Talent

This summer, aged 9, Simon @simontigerh was named a World Science Scholar and joined a two-year program for the world’s most exceptional young math talents, as the youngest among the 75 students selected in 2018 and 2019. See the official press release for more info: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190905005166/en/World-Science-Festival-Announces-Newest-Class-%E2%80%9CWorld

Simon’s passion for science and his unique way to see the world have blossomed again once we have pulled him out of school, where he was becoming increasingly unhappy and was considered a problem student. The only way to set his mind free and allow him to follow the path that suits him best, the path of self-directed learning, was to leave Simon’s native Amsterdam and The Netherlands, where school attendance is compulsory.


I am sharing this at the time when educational freedom and parental rights in The Netherlands are in serious danger to become limited even further. It is bittersweet to celebrate Simon’s beautiful journey and at the same time see how The Netherlands are chasing away extreme talent as we are aware of more stories similar to that of Simon’s.

art, Crafty, Geometry Joys, Math and Computer Science Everywhere, Math Riddles, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Simon makes gamez, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book, Together with sis

Math puzzles: Is it Possible?

Simon has been fascinated by these possible-impossible puzzles (that he picked up from the MajorPrep channel) for a couple of days. He prepared many paper visuals so that Dad and I could try solving them. This morning he produced this beautiful piece of design:

Simon showing one of the puzzles to another parent while waiting for Neva during her hockey training
Simon’s original drawing of the doors puzzle. The solution of the puzzle is based on graph theory and the Eulerian trail rule that the number of nodes with an odd degree should be either 0 or 2 to be able to draw a shape without lifting your pencil. The number of rooms with an odd number of doors in the puzzle is 4 (including the space surrounding the rectangle), that’s why it’s impossible to close all the doors by walking though each of them only once.
Simon explaining odd degree nodes
Computer Science, Crafty, Logic, Math and Computer Science Everywhere, Murderous Maths, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book, Together with sis

The Diffe-Hellman key exchange algorithm

This is Simon explaining Diffe-Hellman key exchange (also called DiffeHellman protocol). He first explained the algorithm mixing watercolours (a color representing a key/ number) and then mathematically. The algorithm allows two parties (marked “you” and “your friend” in Simon’s diagram) with no prior knowledge of each other to establish a shared secret key over an insecure channel (a public area or an “eavesdropper”). This key can then be used to encrypt subsequent communications using a symmetric keycipher. Simon calls it “a neat algorithm”). Later the same night, he also gave me a lecture on a similar but more complicated algorithm called the RSA. Simon first learned about this on Computerphile and then also saw a video about the topic on MajorPrep. And here is another MajorPrep video on modular arithmetic.

originally there are two private keys (a and b) and one public key g
Neva helping Simon to mix the colors representing each key
Mixing g and b to create the public key for b
Mixing the public and the private keys to create a unique shared key
Done!Both a and b have a unique shared key (purplish)
Simon now expressed the same in mathematical formulas
Simon explained that the ≡ symbol (three stripes) means congruence in its modular arithmetic meaning (if a and b are congruent modulo n, they have no difference in modular arithmetic under modulo n)
Computer Science, Electronics, Geometry Joys, Logic, Math and Computer Science Everywhere, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Simon's sketch book, Trips

Doing math and computer science everywhere

One more blog post with impressions from our vacation at the Cote d’Azur in France. Don’t even think of bringing Simon to the beach or the swimming pool without a sketchbook to do some math or computer science!

This is something Simon experimented with extensively last time we were in France. Also called the block-stacking or the book-stacking problem.
Simon wrote this from memory to teach another boy at the pool about ASCII binary. The boy actually seemed to find it interesting. A couple days later two older boys approached him at the local beach and told him that they knew who he was, that he was Simon who only talked about math. Then the boys ran away and Simon ran after them saying “Sorry!” We have explained to him that he doesn’t have to say sorry for loving math and for being the way he is.
Drinking a cocktail at the beach always comes with a little lecture. This time, the truth tables.