Pajama Lecture on Quarks, Leptons and Bosons

Pajama Lecture on Quarks, Leptons and Bosons (and a little bit on the Graviton):

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Simon writing a Matter.js textbook

Simon is currently working on a “Matter.js textbook”, a set of tutorials on how to use Matter.js (a physics library) that he writes on GitHub. Simon writes everything himself, not copying from anywhere. Sometimes he forgets some coding syntax and looks it up in the documentation, but for the rest this is his own text. He explains: “The reason why I am making this textbook is because there are Matter.js tutorials but they are really short and there aren’t many of them. And the only video tutorials are by Daniel Shiffman and they are using P5.js.” If it proves possible, Simon might add video to his GitHub textbook later.

It’s great to observe him type away and when I look over his shoulder, I see that he makes very decent sentences, with a nice tint of humour every now and then.

The link to the textbook:

https://github.com/simon-tiger/matter-js-tutorial/blob/master/README.md

Simon’s Particle Train

Simon made a particle system based on Daniel Shiffman’s latest live stream. Here is the link to Simon’s code on CodePen: https://codepen.io/simontiger/pen/OxvYYW?editors=0010

He also tweeted about it:

Simon Proposes a Community Project in Procedural Design

Inspired by the Processing Community Day projects, Simon came up with an idea to launch his own community project – in procedural design. He used the Coding Train Community Cloud page as inspiration, trying to guess the code used to build it. The videos below show Simon in process of creating the interface.

Simon later presented his project on the Coding Train Slack channel where other members (including Daniel Shiffman) suggested that Simon narrowed down the theme (originally, it was procedural design projects in general and that was too broad). Simon was very upset as he was afraid his “big project” would become too small and couldn’t come up with a theme. Two days later we agreed that he would make several examples for the projects and publish them on the project’s website to give everyone a better idea of what he was looking for.

At the moment, Simon has already published the first example but there seems to be a bug in it, so please view it as work in progress. (Simon originally wrote the code for the Community Cloud project and it worked when he shared it in Processing JS, but on his own project page, using instance mode, the cloud looks like a circle).

Simon writes: Everybody is welcome to contribute to my community project called *Procedural Designs*!
Link to GitHub rep (for this community project: https://github.com/simon-tiger/procedural-designs/ (link to github pages site in the README).

 

 

At Het Pass in Mons (Bergen)

Simon is not really into museums. He prefers to learn things at his own pace and dislikes crowds. The pictures below are from our visit to Het Pass, a science museum in Wallonia, near the French border. The museum is situated in what formerly were mining facilities, the exhibits are interactive, spread out in several oddly shaped buildings connected by industrial bridges and escalators. I believe Simon actually enjoyed the electricity and the genetics rooms, even though the two of us got struck by the electricity from the plasma ball  (painful!):

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Fractal Trees Customized

This weekend Simon came back to his old fascination, Fractal Trees. This time he didn’t just follow along Daniel Shiffman’s coding challenges, but created customized versions of Daniel’s trees, adding color and physics in some cases or writing the code in object oriented manner:

 

 

 

 

 

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