Coding, Computer Science, Experiments, JavaScript, Logic, Murderous Maths, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book

Nash Equilibrium

Simon explaining the Nash Equilibrium with a little game in p5.js. Play it yourself at: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/lfP4dKGCs
Inspired by TedEd video Why do competitors open their stores next to one another? by Jac de Haan.

Crafty, Math and Computer Science Everywhere, Math Riddles, motor skills, Murderous Maths, Simon makes gamez, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book

Proof Visualization. Warning: Mind-boggling!

Inspired by the Card Flipping Proof by Numberphile, Simon created his own version of this proof. He made a solitaire game and proved why it would be impossible to solve with an even number of orange-side-up circles. He drew all the shapes in Microsoft Paint, printed them out and spent something like two hours cutting them out, but it was worth it!

The colourful pieces in the lower row are a “key” to solve the solitaire puzzle. The objective is to remove all the circles. One can only remove a circle if it’s orange side up. Once a circle is removed, its neighbouring circles have to be flipped. Using the key, start with the yellow pieces, and move in the direction of the “grater than” sign (from smallest to largest).

If there’s an odd number of orange circles in the middle, then the end pieces are the same, both orange or both white. In both cases the total number of orange circles will also be odd. If there’s an even number of orange circles in the middle, then the ends have to be different (one orange, one white).

In the case of odd number of orange pieces, the ends have to match. In the case of an even number of orange pieces, you would have pieces that point the same way at both ends. “Now we’ve proven that to make this puzzle possible it has to have an odd number of orange pieces”, Simon says.

Why? Imagine a stick figure that always walks to the right, but always faces in the direction of the arrow (as in it can’t go backwards). It would flip every time it reaches an orange circle. Focusing on everything except the ends, if there are an odd number of orange circles, the puzzle pieces would face the other way. Which means that the end pieces are the same, and therefore the end circles are the same. If there are an even number of orange circles in the middle, the puzzle pieces would face the same way. Which means that the end pieces are different, and therefore the end circles are different.

Simon finds this sort of proof easy, but I felt like my brains are going to boil and dripple through my ears and nostrils. He patently exlained it to me several times and types the above explanation, too.

Contributing, Group, Math Riddles, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Set the beautiful mind free, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book

MathsJam Antwerp 20 November 2019. A Blast and a Responsibility.

Today, Simon returned to a problem he first encountered at a MathsJam in summer: “Pick random numbers between 0 and 1, until the sum exceeds 1. What is the expected number of numbers you’ll pick?” Back in June, Simon already knew the answer was e, but his attempt to prove it didn’t quite work back then. Today, he managed to prove his answer!

The same proof in a more concise way:

At MathsJam last night, Simon was really eager to show his proof to Rudi Penne, a professor from the University of Antwerp who was sitting next to Simon last time he gave it a go back in June. Rudi kept Simon’s notes and told me he really admired the way Simon’s reasoning spans borders between subjects (the way Simon can start with combinatorics and jump to geometry), something that many students nurtured within the structured subject system are incapable of doing, Rudi said. Who needs borders?

Later the same evening, Simon had a blast demonstrating the proof to a similar problem to a larger grateful and patient audience, including Professor David Eelbode. The first proof was Simon’s own, the second problem (puzzle with a shrinking bullseye) and proof came from Grant Sanderson (3Blue1Brown) on Numberphile.

“Don’t allow any constraints to dull his excitement and motivation!” Rudi told me as Simon was waiting for us to leave. “That’s a huge responsibility you’ve got there, in front of the world”.

Group, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Set the beautiful mind free, Simon teaching, Together with sis

Social encounters

Such a pleasant play date last week with another eager learner. Simon shared his GeoGebra skills and some geometrical paper tricks, among other things. It’s heartwarming to see Simon blossom socially, he is growingly attentive to younger kids and generally engaging with people of various ages, as long as they show interest in anything Simon has an understanding of.

Crafty, Electricity, Electronics, Engineering, Experiments, Geometry Joys, Notes on everyday life, Physics, Simon teaching, Together with sis

Vanishing Letters

Simon’s way to celebrate Helloween: a little demo about how red marker reflects red LED light and becomes invisible. A nice trick in the dark!

We also had so much fun with the blue LED lamp a couple days ago when Simon discovered that it projects perfect conic sections on the wall! Depending on the angle at which he was holding the lamp, he got a circle, an ellipse, a hyperbola and a parabola! Originally just a spheric light source we grabbed after the power went out in the bathroom, in Simon’s hands the lamp has become an inspiring science demo tool.

Computer Science, Engineering, Good Reads, Math and Computer Science Everywhere, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Physics, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book, Together with sis

Zutopedia, a fun Computer Science Resource

Through the whole moth of October, Simon really loved watching Computer Science and Physics videos by Udi Aharoni, a researcher at IBM research labs and creator of the Udiprod channel https://www.youtube.com/user/udiprod and the Zutopedia website http://www.zutopedia.com/ Simon’s favourite has been the Halting Problem video that he also explained to his little sister.

In the example below, Simon has applied a compression algorithm to a sentence by transforming the sentence into a tree where all the letters have their corresponding frequencies in this sentence. “Can you get back to the sentence? You have to first transform the letters into ones and zeros using the tree (the tree is a way to encode it into ones and zeros that’s better than ASCII)”.

Simon learned this at http://www.zutopedia.com/compression.html
thanks to the Udiprod channel, Simon has also revisited sorting algorithms and spent hours comparing them, this time using self-made number cards
Geometry Joys, Math and Computer Science Everywhere, Math Tricks, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book

Sums of consecutive numbers

While waiting to pick his little sister up from a ballet class, Simon explaining general algebraic formulas to calculate the sums of consecutive numbers. He derives the formulas from drawing the numbers as dots forming certain geometric chapes.
consecutive integers
consecutive odd integers
Math Tricks, Murderous Maths, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book

Modular Arithmetic visualized with Wheel Math

Simon learned this method from a MajorPrep video and was completely obsessed about it for a good couple of weeks, challenging everyone in our inner circle to factorize numbers using the wheels.

Simon’s proof for the 7 section circle. The remainders lie in the smallest circle (for example, the section where all the numbers are divisible by 7 have a zero in the inside circle, and in the section to the right you can see 1 in the inside i.e. all the numbers in this section mod 7 equal 1)
12 sections
5 sections
Crafty, Geometry Joys, Good Reads, Logic, Murderous Maths, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book

Attractiveness vs. Personality

Debunking the stereotype that all attractive guys/girls are mean, something Simon has learned from MajorPrep and the How Not to Be Wrong book by Jordan Ellenberg. The slope in dark blue pen shows our scope of attention, a pretty narrow part of the actually diverse field of choices.