Live Stream #15. Chapter 6 of Living Code: Particle Systems

Simon’s latest Live Stream about Chapter 6 of his “Living Code” Course (particle systems!), loosely based on Daniel Shiffman’s Nature of Code. “I’m also going to live stream a surprise maths video”, – at the beginning of the stream Simon devoted some time to the magic hexagon problem.

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Live Stream #14. 15’s Puzzle Redo continued.

In this live session, Simon continue my 15s puzzle redo live session (“yet again, but I swear this is going to be the last time I do this!” Simon said). Here’s a link to the previous part. This week’s live stream went great, Simon kept it concise, didn’t panic while debugging, largely thanks to a wonderful supportive audience. And he even got some interesting personal questions asked in the end!

Liva Stream #13. Math Puzzle: Logic.

In this live session, Simon works a little on his 15s puzzle redo that he started in his previous live session: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixkLFYcb0T0 and programs a math/logic puzzle, checking whether the statement “Every card with a T on one side has a 3 on the other” is true or false. The original puzzle comes from an old video by James Grime, recorded before Simon was born (the fact that Simon finds particularly funny):

Reds and Greens

Simon has crafted a nice game today, inspired by a video in which mathematician Katie Steckles shows several mathematical games. Simon wasn’t sure what the game was called so he named it “Reds and Greens”. The objective of the game is to accumulate a set of three cards sharing the same property (such as the same number of green dots or red dots, the same total number of reds and greens or a set in which all the three possible variants – one, two and three dots of the same color – would be present). Each player pulls a card from the stack (all the cards are lying face up) and the one who collects a set first wins. Simon has actually programmed the cards in Processing (Java) – quite a strenuous task. Below is the jpeg pic of what he made and his code in Processing.

Reds and Greens 10 Apr 2018

 

Reds and Greens Code 1 10 Apr 2018Reds and Greens Code 2 10 Apr 2018

Simon also explained how the game is very similar to Tic Tac Toe, look at the photo below and you’ll see why:

dsc_0935181490489.jpg

Live Stream #12: 15’s Puzzle Redo

Simon had quite an audience yesterday during his live lesson. In this week’s session, Simon remade his 15’s Puzzle in Processing and explained the math behind it. He plans to finish the puzzle during his next live stream in two weeks from now (on April 19 at 17:15 CET).

 

Tantrix Game in JavaScript

Simon talking about his Tantrix Game code and the math behind it. It has been Simon’s first community project, many thanks to everyone who has contributed hexagonal tiles for the game! The game isn’t finished yet, but the video gives a good insight into the work in progress. Simon will finish it at a later date he says. Feel free to try and finish it on your own and share your results! The code is on GitHub at: https://github.com/simon-tiger/tantrix

This is a separate link to see what Simon has got so far in action: https://simon-tiger.github.io/tantrix/tantrix/

 

Below is Simon’s original YouTube post summoning contributions:

Simon and Daniel Shiffman

Today is one of the most beautiful days in Simon’s life: NYU Associate Professor and the creator of Coding Train Daniel Shiffman has been Simon’s guarding angel, role model and source of all the knowledge Simon has accumulated so far (in programming, math, community ethics and English), and today Simon got to meet him for the first time in real life!

Daniel Shiffman posted:

Muredo in JavaScript

Simon programmed this game a couple of weeks ago but I have waited to publish the video as I hoped he would finish it and get in on GitHub. Unfortunately he got stuck and didn’t return to the project since then, this why I’m now publishing an unfinished game. The unfinished code is on Simon’s GitHub: https://github.com/simon-tiger/muredo

Link to the current version of the game (try playing it online): https://simon-tiger.github.io/muredo/muredo/

Simon writes: “The game board is ready, you can move the game pieces on to the board and roll the die. As the next step, I want to have a feature of highlighting the correct tile – how can I do that?

I also don’t have the following things yet: the multiplying feature, choosing one of multiple options and the winning condition.”

I love Simon’s color choice and the whole interface. Originally, it’s a Japanese game and I think he has made it look very much like spring in Japan.

The objective of the game is to fill in the little square making a 3×3 grid. A player throws the dice and puts one game piece on the corresponding place on the board. When she throws again, she can multiply the value on the die by the value of the place where she has her game piece (or game pieces) if the product of the hat multiplication sum can be found among the nine numbers on the 3×3 grid. If not, the player either puts another game piece on the board, to fill the value of the last throw, or misses a turn.

Conway Checkers game in Processing

Simon has programmed a Conway Checkers game in Processing (Java). The game is a math version of traditional checkers and was invented by John Conway (famous as the author of the Game of Life). Simon learned about Conway Checkers in a Numberphile video and decided to make a computer version. It’s available on GitHub to download: https://github.com/simon-tiger/conway-checkers

Simon also wrote the rules of the game on GitHub in the README: https://github.com/simon-tiger/conway-checkers/blob/master/README.md

 

A Cool Number Guessing Trick! Or Brown’s Criterion in Processing

This is a fun number guessing trick, based on powers of 2 and the Fibonacci sequence, that even little kids can enjoy. You don’t have to know anything about the powers of 2 or Fibonacci to play this game, just basic addition up to 30. Yet, if you are more advanced, it is very interesting to see what lies underneath and even apply binary numbers to your guessing technique. Simon learned this trick from the Numberphile video on Brown’s Criterion.

Simon also made his own version of the game, based on prime numbers:

In this second part of the cool number guessing trick session, Simon shows his own version of the game, based on prime numbers. He discovered that it’s impossible to create this game for all numbers between 1 and 30 because some numbers (4 and 6) cannot be expressed as a sum of two different primes and was very upset about it. Yet he did manage to make the game and it works for all numbers except 4 and 6. To play the game, one player thinks of a number and the other player tries to guess it by asking whether the number is present on different sheets of paper. The answer is the sum of the numbers located in the top left corners of all the yes-sheets.

And please check out Part 3, where Simon actually programmed this game in Java (Processing):

Now it’s the computer guessing the number! The game is available on Simon’s GitHub to download at: https://github.com/simon-tiger/browns-criterion

Simon explained the rules in the GitHub README (because he “has a different writing style than Mom”, he said): https://github.com/simon-tiger/browns-criterion/blob/master/README.md