Color Opposites

Here Simon placed the primary colors in the next to the secondary ones (that he mixed using only the three primary colors) so that the colors that are absolute opposites of each other are also standing opposite to each other: blue is the opposite of yellow, magenta is the opposite of green and red is the opposite of cyan.

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How much iron is there in your favorite cereal?

If you put a cereal flake in a bowl of water you can steer it with a strong magnet. The magnets above aren’t strong enough, but the really powerful ones below (that are dangerous to pull apart as they can actually injure you) are:

And if you grind the cereal into powder, the powder sticks to the magnet because of the iron atoms in the cereal:

Inspired by the Veritasium channel.

Observing the Red Moon during the eclipse last Friday night

We were also lucky to have friends with a telescope over at Simon’s grandma’s summer house in Friesland last weekend and saw the Moon a little closer than as shown on these mobile phone pics I took. It was very warm and great to be outside at midnight after many hours in the train on the melting railroad (the train couldn’t move for one and a half hours due to the switches malfunctioning in the heat).

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Simon watching Daniel Shiffman’s live stream on Machine Learning outside:

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The rest of the trip to London

Simon loved the Science Museum, even though he did not get to see the Klein Bottles from the museum’s permanent collection (none of them was on display). He particularly enjoyed the math and information age spaces. The Original Tour was a success, too – giggling at all the jokes on the English audio guide, he was bubbling with joy that he could follow everything and was actively studying the map, together with Dad. The only thing Simon really hated to tears was The Tower.

The Maisie Day

For Simon and me, this book (“Infinite Lives of Maisie Day” by Christopher Edge) has probably been one of our most profound experiences of the year. We read it together, sometimes, giggling with joy as we recognized Simon’s favorite topics interwoven in the plot (like that the main character also dreams of proving the Riemann hypothesis), and sometimes tears choking our throats as we went through the sad and scary bits of the story. And what a trip down the memory lane last night, at the Royal Institution in London, where we attended a lecture about the science behind “Infinite Lives of Maisie Day”! As Simon proudly told one of the lecturers (University College London’s cosmologist Dr Andrew Pontzen) after the show, he even predicted something important in the book. Simon recognized that Maisie turned into a mirror image of herself after she had traveled around the Mobius-shaped universe, just as depicted in Escher’s “the impossible staircase” painting . “But that’s only possible if you’re flat, a 2D object! So it’s not correct in the book, but they probably put that in to make it simpler,” Simon laughed. “You’re absolutely right! Keep doing science!” the cosmologist told him. @Ri_Science