Cannon Game in Processing

Simon shows the Cannon game he created in Processing (Java). He says he was inspired by the Stackoverflow forum, where he saw an example of the game and later wrote the code for a similar game himself. I saw him quickly write the code in a matter of perhaps two hours. Simon will post his code on GitHub once he has added a couple extra features.

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Introducing Siraj Raval

Simon has been watching a lot of Siraj Raval’s videos on neural networks lately, brushing up his Python syntax and derivatives. He has even been trying the great Jupyter editor, where one can build one’s own neural network and install libraries with pretrained networks https://try.jupyter.org/

Just like with Danel Shiffman’s videos, the remarkable thing about Siraj’s (very challenging) courses is that they also touch upon so many subjects outside programming (like art and music and stock exchange) and are compiled with a sublime sense of humour.

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Simon’s Particle Train

Simon made a particle system based on Daniel Shiffman’s latest live stream. Here is the link to Simon’s code on CodePen: https://codepen.io/simontiger/pen/OxvYYW?editors=0010

He also tweeted about it:

Simon’s Chat Bots

Inspired by Daniel Shiffman’s recent live stream on chat bots, Simon made two chat bots himself. He seems to really enjoy the logic behind programming bot conversations. Daniel Shiffman even tried Simon’s second chat bot out during another streaming session today, which made Simon extremely happy:

Daniel trying Simon's chat bot 9 Oct 2017

And this is how Simon filled his chat bot in himself:

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Here is the link to Simon’s demonstration of a chatbot as a programming language, anyone can play with it online at: https://play.rivescript.com/s/HwDyLgbKwY

 

 

 

 

The Towers of Hanoi

Simon is a fan of the 3Blue1Brown channel and absolutely loved their video on solving the Towers of Hanoi puzzle with binary and ternary numbers. He practiced a lot with both. Eventually he developed his own, rhythmic, way to solve the puzzle:

Applying ternary numbers (solving the puzzle in 80 steps):

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The video on 3Blue1Brown channel:

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Applying binary numbers (solving the puzzle in 15 steps):

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Simon watching 3Blue1Brown videos:

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He also really liked the video on Visualizing the Riemann zeta function and yelled “Mom, look how beautiful this is!” the whole time:

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Still from the 3Blue1Brown video that Simon found mesmerizing:

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Lessons for Mom continued

It’s great that Simon continues to find the time to teach me some JavaScript. We’re now done with the Basic course he had prepared, below are some impressions. The video is of the rectangle intersection lesson and the “highway” we built.

Later, Simon decided he was wrong with the math defining the vehicles intersecting each other and changed it to:

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This is Simon’s explanation why he changed the formula:

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From a lesson on importing images:

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Circle Intersection (I like the design!)

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Simon and Neva’s symbiosis

Simon is best friends with his little sis (who has just turned 6). He teaches her to make molecules

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and she teaches him to play hopscotch

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and to enjoy a walk in the evening

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and to play together like kids do, including role-play (which Simon has finally mastered)

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and he teaches her the tables of addition

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and she teaches him to play outside

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and he teaches her spatial orientation and more addition and subtraction with Magformers elements.

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I often hear them say “I love you” to each other. Sometimes they talk about how things will be when they become old, really old. “I will probably die earlier than you,” – Simon said. “Because I’m two years older”. – “No, Simon, it doesn’t work that way”, – she answers. “Maybe not then. Maybe people won’t die anymore. Maybe there will be something left of me”.

Graphic arithmetics

Simon is not only doing Precalculus en Calculus, but also enjoys maths at all levels (see previous post about The Secrets of Sums). For example, we do some Dutch elementary school tests to make sure he can handle the arithmetic. Below is a beautiful example of how his mind works. The task was to find the number exactly between 36×36 and 38×38 on the number line. Simon immediately came up with a parabolic graph and said it couldn’t be 37×37, based on that graph. I think he can graph just about anything in the world 🙂

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Magformers Pythagoras set

Simon pulled out his old Magformers Pythagoras set and this time around, he really nailed all the tasks independently. The set offers a variety of puzzles to “prove” the Pythagorean theorem and apply it to other shapes (even 3D!), as well as teaches several more tricks (such as the ratios between the areas of similar triangles or the areas of parallelograms).

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Chinese square Proof:

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Area of Parallelograms:

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Applying Pythagorean theorem to other shapes:

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Extended theorem by the Greek mathematician Pappus:

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Areas of Similar Triangles:

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More of Pythagorean theorem with various shapes:

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Puzzles:

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