Multiplying Complex Numbers in Processing

The math behind this project comes from the amazing math channel 3Blue1Brown: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJYmyhnaaek

 

 

 

 

 

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Tetris in Processing continued

Inspired by a Meth Meth Method Tetris video, Simon has come back to his Tetris project in Processing, something he started a long while ago and never finished. At the moment, the primary difficulty he experiences is having the pieces accumulate at the bottom of the grid and not vanish immediately once hit by other pieces. Work in progress.

Live Stream #4 on December 14. Living Code > Vectors.

Simon debuted with his own coding course last week! The course is called “Living Code” and Simon has already planned all its sessions for the year ahead. He is going to teach the course as part of his live streams (once in two weeks on Thursday evenings at 17 CET), although not every live stream will include Living Code sessions.

In the first Living Code session (that was live on December 14), Simon introduced the course and its Chapter 1: Vectors. He talked about mathematical operations with vectors, their magnitude, acceleration and normalisation.

There were no crashes or technical issues this time and Simon remained amazingly focused and organised during the stream, he had actually created a schedule for himself beforehand (without any incentive on my behalf):

Timestamps for this live session (new):
0:00:00 – 0:05:00: Announcements
0:05:00 – 0:15:00: Starting Question & Answer
0:15:00 – 0:20:00: Intro to Living Code
0:20:00 – 0:30:00: What is a Vector?
0:30:00 – 0:40:00: Vector math: subtract, multiply, divide
0:40:00 – 0:50:00: Vector math: magnitude, heading, normalize
0:50:00 – 1:00:00: Physics: acceleration, (maybe) jerk
1:00:00 – 1:10:00: Ending Question & Answer

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Below is the archived version of Simon’s first Living Code course lessons:

Simon a Processing member!

Simon has become a Processing Foundation member! We love Processing! Anyone is welcome to join, just go to Processing.org to support this wonderful open source platform – what better way to celebrate this season than donate for a more enlighten future? We can rightfully say that Processing has played a huge role in Simon’s development as a young programmer so far and he definitely hopes to become an even more active member in the years to come.

Schermafbeelding 2017-12-21 om 17.52.24

The Neural Nets are here!

Simon has started building neural networks in Python! For the moment, he has succeeded in making two working neural nets (a Perceptron and a Feed Forward neural net). He used the sigmoid activation function for both. The code partially derived from Siraj Raval’s “The Math of Intelligence” tutorials.

ML Perceptron 10 Dec 2017

The FF was tougher to build:

Simon’s nets run locally (on our home pc), but he will need more computational power for the more complex future projects, so he signed up to this wonderful online resource called FloydHub! FloydHub is sort of a heroku for deep learning, a Platform-as-a-Service for training and deploying deep learning models in the cloud. It uses Amazon, which Simon could, too, but it would have been a lot more expensive and tedious work to set up.

Simon’s next step will be another supervised learning project, a Recurrent Neural Net that will generate text. He has already started building it and fed it one book to read! In this video he explains how character-based text generators work:

The Snowball Throwing Game in Processing

Simon invented this fun game in Processing after he and his little sister had some proper winter fun outdoors in the fresh December snow (quite rare for the local climate and thus immensely cherished by the little people). The game is about throwing  snowballs in such a trajectory that they stick to one another, forming a super-snowball. After I finished filming this, the two snowball throwers had such a great time with the game that I dare say the giggling effect from of this 2D simulation overshadowed the real snowball fight that had originally inspired it. They did love playing in the real snow on the next day though, until it melted away.

 

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Playing with light and mirrors

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Its Highness Magformers S.T.E.A.M. Master Set, Simon’s long aspired gift for Sinterklaas (the biggest holiday of the year for the Dutch) and what he built with it. The set mainly focuses on studying the way light is reflected by mirrors (such as in a camera or a periscope).

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Simon and Neva had been singing the traditional Sinterklaas songs (with new non-racist and non-violent lyrics) every evening and finding small gifts in their shoes every morning for two weeks, this whole roller-coaster culminating in the Sinterklaas “pakjesavond” (the night of the presents) in early December with the extended family in Utrecht, where the “real gifts” were secretly delivered by Sint Nicolaas and his helpers. In the picture above, Simon is reading one of the poems (there are poems accompanying every gift). Sinterklaas was up all night last night writing poems.

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At home unpacking the gift.