Live Stream #16: Twins Game in Processing and Chapter 6 of Living Code.

Simon’s live stream yesterday had several supportive viewers. Simon started making a game of Twins in Processing (Java) and went on with his JavaScript course Living Code, that is based on Daniel Shiffman’s Nature of Code. He tries to keep his live sessions concise now, no longer than 1,5 hours. Note that in the summer, all the live streams will be in Tuesdays in order not to clash with Daniel Shiffman’s summer schedule.

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Simon’s Times Tables Visualization

Times Tables Visualization 31 May 2018

Simon shows his Times Tables Visualization in Processing (Java) and talks about how it’s connected to Mandelbrot Set. See the code with the README on GitHub: https://github.com/simon-tiger/times_tables

View the full animation here:

 

Simon writes: This is a visualization for the times tables from 1 to 200 (including the in-between numbers that are multiples of .01). I used modular arithmetic to write the code:

0. Start with a circle with 200 points (I’ve chosen 200, your number could be anything, but we’ll use 200 in the instructions).

1. Label the points from 0-199, then from 200-399, then from 400-599, and so on (you’re labeling the same point several times).

2. We’ll first do the 2x table. 2×0=0, same thing so we don’t do anything. 2×1=2, so we connect 1 to 2. 2×2=4, so we connect 2 to 4, and so on.

3. 2×100=200, where’s the 200? It goes in a circle so 200 is where the 0 is, and now you can keep going.

4. Now you could keep going beyond 199, but actually, you’re going to get the same lines you already had!

5. You can now create separate images for the 2x table (which we’ve just done), the 3x table, the 4x table, the 5x table, and so on. You can even try in-between numbers (like 2.53) if you want.

In the program, you see an animated image at the left of the screen, and 4 static images (representing examples of times tables) to the right of that. They represent the 2x, 34x, 51x and 99x tables.

The idea of a times tables visualization comes from a video by Mathologer, but the code Simon wrote completely on his own.

Live Stream #15. Chapter 6 of Living Code: Particle Systems

Simon’s latest Live Stream about Chapter 6 of his “Living Code” Course (particle systems!), loosely based on Daniel Shiffman’s Nature of Code. “I’m also going to live stream a surprise maths video”, – at the beginning of the stream Simon devoted some time to the magic hexagon problem.

Live Stream #14. 15’s Puzzle Redo continued.

In this live session, Simon continue my 15s puzzle redo live session (“yet again, but I swear this is going to be the last time I do this!” Simon said). Here’s a link to the previous part. This week’s live stream went great, Simon kept it concise, didn’t panic while debugging, largely thanks to a wonderful supportive audience. And he even got some interesting personal questions asked in the end!

Reds and Greens

Simon has crafted a nice game today, inspired by a video in which mathematician Katie Steckles shows several mathematical games. Simon wasn’t sure what the game was called so he named it “Reds and Greens”. The objective of the game is to accumulate a set of three cards sharing the same property (such as the same number of green dots or red dots, the same total number of reds and greens or a set in which all the three possible variants – one, two and three dots of the same color – would be present). Each player pulls a card from the stack (all the cards are lying face up) and the one who collects a set first wins. Simon has actually programmed the cards in Processing (Java) – quite a strenuous task. Below is the jpeg pic of what he made and his code in Processing.

Reds and Greens 10 Apr 2018

 

Reds and Greens Code 1 10 Apr 2018Reds and Greens Code 2 10 Apr 2018

Simon also explained how the game is very similar to Tic Tac Toe, look at the photo below and you’ll see why:

dsc_0935181490489.jpg

Live Stream #12: 15’s Puzzle Redo

Simon had quite an audience yesterday during his live lesson. In this week’s session, Simon remade his 15’s Puzzle in Processing and explained the math behind it. He plans to finish the puzzle during his next live stream in two weeks from now (on April 19 at 17:15 CET).

 

Tantrix Game in JavaScript

Simon talking about his Tantrix Game code and the math behind it. It has been Simon’s first community project, many thanks to everyone who has contributed hexagonal tiles for the game! The game isn’t finished yet, but the video gives a good insight into the work in progress. Simon will finish it at a later date he says. Feel free to try and finish it on your own and share your results! The code is on GitHub at: https://github.com/simon-tiger/tantrix

This is a separate link to see what Simon has got so far in action: https://simon-tiger.github.io/tantrix/tantrix/

 

Below is Simon’s original YouTube post summoning contributions:

Simon and Daniel Shiffman

Today is one of the most beautiful days in Simon’s life: NYU Associate Professor and the creator of Coding Train Daniel Shiffman has been Simon’s guarding angel, role model and source of all the knowledge Simon has accumulated so far (in programming, math, community ethics and English), and today Simon got to meet him for the first time in real life!

Daniel Shiffman posted:

Muredo in JavaScript

Simon programmed this game a couple of weeks ago but I have waited to publish the video as I hoped he would finish it and get in on GitHub. Unfortunately he got stuck and didn’t return to the project since then, this why I’m now publishing an unfinished game. The unfinished code is on Simon’s GitHub: https://github.com/simon-tiger/muredo

Link to the current version of the game (try playing it online): https://simon-tiger.github.io/muredo/muredo/

Simon writes: “The game board is ready, you can move the game pieces on to the board and roll the die. As the next step, I want to have a feature of highlighting the correct tile – how can I do that?

I also don’t have the following things yet: the multiplying feature, choosing one of multiple options and the winning condition.”

I love Simon’s color choice and the whole interface. Originally, it’s a Japanese game and I think he has made it look very much like spring in Japan.

The objective of the game is to fill in the little square making a 3×3 grid. A player throws the dice and puts one game piece on the corresponding place on the board. When she throws again, she can multiply the value on the die by the value of the place where she has her game piece (or game pieces) if the product of the hat multiplication sum can be found among the nine numbers on the 3×3 grid. If not, the player either puts another game piece on the board, to fill the value of the last throw, or misses a turn.