Coding, JavaScript, Math Riddles, Murderous Maths, Simon makes gamez, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code

Cat and Mouse

This is a project that Simon started a few weeks ago but never finished, so I think it’s time I archive it here. It’s based upon this wonderful Numberphile video, in which Ben Sparks shows a curious math problem – a game of cat and mouse – in a computer simulation he’d built. The setting is that the mouse is swimming in a round pond and is trying to escape from a cat that is running around the pond. What is the strategy that the mouse should apply to escape, considering that it swims at a quarter of the speed the cat runs?

Simon came up with his own code to recreate the simulation from the Numberphile video. In the four fragments I recorded, he showcases what he has built. Please ignore my silly questions, at the time of the recording I hadn’t viewed the Numberphile video yet and had no idea what the problem entailed.

Coding, JavaScript, Milestones, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code

Building a 2048 Game. Part 3.

Simon’s general plan for his 2048 project:

Link to the project in progress on GitHub: https://github.com/simon-tiger/2048

In this third part he shows how he changed the fonts, how that messed up the code, how he solved that problem and also how he created a function to move any tile anywhere else on the grid. Simon doesn’t yet have the function to move a tile to the right place – he’ll cover that in game mechanics in Part 4.

Link to Parts 1 and 2.

Coding, JavaScript, Simon makes gamez, Simon's Own Code

Simon’s own 2048

Link to the project in progress on GitHub: https://github.com/simon-tiger/2048

Simon has started building his own 2048 game. In the two videos below he explains the initial stages of the project and how he has created the tiles. At the moment, he plans to build a classic 2048 first and create a few desktop versions of more exotic variations of 2048 later.

Coding, CSS, html, JavaScript, Magformers, Simon makes gamez, Simon's Own Code

Automatic Magformers Table

Magformers (magnetic building sets involving maths) used to be Simon’s greatest passion when he was six (just a year ago!) and this week he has been travelling in time to revisit this old love, after his little sis received a new Magformers set as a present. What Simon did next was to combine Magformers and programming: he created an automatic table listing various Magformers models (in HTML/ JavaScript). The sets that can be used to build those models were to get filled in automatically, depending on the number of specific shapes needed for every model and the number of such shapes available in every set. As you might imagine, this involved many lines of code and a whole lot of computational thinking. At one point, when Simon was nearly done, he realized that the column listing the sets wouldn’t get filled in properly. He had a bug in his program that he couldn’t find, so he turned to his older friends in Slack for help. It’s such a pleasure to see him communicate with these experienced programmers on a regular basis now and unbelievable how eager and resourceful they are. One of Simon’s friends from Slack even created his own version of Simon’s program in CodePen! What makes it even more wonderful is that Simon no longer hesitates to apply the good advice he gets. The next day he wrote some “helper functions” and the table worked!

Simon hasn’t put this project online yet, as he wanted to make it more interactive and hasn’t managed to do that so far.