Exercise, Math Riddles, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book, Together with sis, Trips

Math on the Beach

Sunday at the beach, Simon was reenacting the 5 doors and a cat puzzle (he had learned this puzzle from the Mind Your Decisions channel). The puzzle is about guessing behind which door the cat is hiding in as few guesses as possible, while the cat is allowed to move one door further after every wrong guess.

the little houses served as “doors”, and Simon’s little sister Neva as “the cat”

“Here’s a fun fact!” Simon said all of a sudden. “If you add up all the grains of sand on all the beaches all over the world, you are going to get several quintillion sand grains or several times 10^18!” He then proceeded to try to calculate how many sand grains there might be at the beach around us…

In the evening, while having a meal by the sea, Simon challenged Dad with a Brilliant.org problem he particularly liked:

Simon’s explanation sheet (The general formulas are written by Simon, the numbers underneath the table are his Dad’s, who just couldn’t believe Simon’s counterintuitive solution at first and wanted check the concrete sums. He later accepted his defeat):

Math Riddles, Math Tricks, Murderous Maths, Simon's sketch book

Math Fun

magic rectangle
magic square
challenging Dad to guess what the magic square and the magic rectangle are
fun multiplication shortcuts
favourite Brilliant.org problem (Simon has actually carried out an experiment with in real life marbles is a sack to see whether the probability predicted is correct)

Simon finds the explanation on Brilliant.org incomplete, so he started a discussion about it on the Brilliant community page: https://brilliant.org/discussions/thread/games-of-chance-course-marble-problem/?ref_id=1570424

challenging Dad with the Brilliant.org problem
chalenging Dad with the Brilliant.org problem (Simon has also taken this problem to show to his French teacher)
Coding, Computer Science, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Python, RaspberryPi, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code, Simon's sketch book

More Sorting Algorithms!

An update to Simon’s new project: a series of video tutorials on sorting algorithms! See the full playlist here.

Part 7: Heapsort

Finally, parts 6 and 7 of Simon’s exciting series of video tutorials about sorting algorithms are done! In the videos, Simon codes on his RaspberryPi, but here is the link to the Python code (parts 6 – 7) available on his GitHub page:
https://gist.github.com/simon-tiger/be3864b36f6d89fecd06f150063a6321

Part 6: Shellsort

The code of the sorting algorithms discussed in the previous videos (parts 1 – 5) is available here: https://gist.github.com/simon-tiger/5be70247a066f69c2578be5bb8e41e59

Simon wrote the Shellsort code himself. He tried to run his own code for Heapsort as well, but didn’t get the list fully sorted, so in the end he implemented the heapsort code that he learned from Brilliant.

“Then, with VERY much relief, I MASSIVELY condensed the code (to just 3 lines!), using Zax Rosenberg’s blog“, Simon adds.

Coding, Computer Science, Good Reads, Logic, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Python, Set the beautiful mind free

Fun with Brilliant’s Computer Courses

“Mom, how long would it take a supercomputer running at 10^15 additions per second to calculate the 1000th Fibonacci number?”

Simon has learned this problem from the new course he is following on Brilliant.org: Computer Science Algorithms. Simon worked it out on an A3 sketch book sheet and got the answer correct: it would take longer than the age of the Universe!

Simon working the answer out again to show me the way he solved it

Simon has already finished the Computer Science Fundamentals course! It has been Simon’s idea to take up the courses on Brilliant.org again and he has been working independently, driven entirely by his intrinsic motivation.

The course has also inspired Simon to work on a very large scale project: record a series of tutorials where he explains all the best known sorting algorithms and comes up with the Python code for them on his RaspberryPi!

Murderous Maths, Uncategorized

Solving Equations continued

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From Yesterday’s math class. Simon continued with the equations and managed to complete four quizzes on Brilliant.org within one hour. He neglects writing things down though, trying to solve everything in his mind. So far it has been a success, but both his math tutor and I are trying to explain it to him that the more complex equations are easier solved when writing them out. Algebra > Solving Equations > Setting Up Equations, Simple Equations, Multi-Step Equations, Isolating a Variable.

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Milestones, Murderous Maths

Algebra>Solving Equations>Balancing Scales

This morning Simon was crying bitterly when he thought that the equation to calculate the resistance in a video wasn’t correct. We wrote the solution down together in detail and it was correct. I suddenly knew what the stumbling block was – Simon isn’t really familiar with solving equations yet! This is one of those cases when you work top down and hit a gap. I guess equations will be the topic of his math lessons for a while now. I love it how on Brilliant.org they start teaching the concept of equation by comparing it to scales. Here is what he accomplished today: Algebra>Solving Equations> Warmup and Balancing Scales

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