Coding, Community Projects, Contributing, Notes on everyday life, Python, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code, Together with sis

Drawing with Turtle

Here we are, on the day of my 40th birthday, while recording a lesson of drawing with turtle in Python. It was meant to be my birthday present, a beginner-friendly hour of code, in which Neva would also be able to take an active part. We ended up recording two beautiful sessions only to find out later that our screen capture video was irreparably corrupted (never record in mp4 in OBS). Simon was inconsolable. We also thought this webcam recording was gone but rediscovered it a day later. So nice to have it as a memory.

And I’m relieved to say that we have managed to redo the whole project from scratch today (sadly without Neva’s participation this time as she had better things to do, so I look rather redundant sitting there next to Simon giving the lesson). Once Simon is done with the editing (which is another two days of work I’m afraid), he will upload the hour of code on YouTube. He also plans to create a website for this project to enable his “students” to draw in a built-in application.

From our session today:

And here is an example of Simon drawing with turtle for his own pleasure, a Serpinski triangle in Python (a few days ago):

Coding, JavaScript, Math Riddles, Murderous Maths, Simon makes gamez, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code

Cat and Mouse

This is a project that Simon started a few weeks ago but never finished, so I think it’s time I archive it here. It’s based upon this wonderful Numberphile video, in which Ben Sparks shows a curious math problem – a game of cat and mouse – in a computer simulation he’d built. The setting is that the mouse is swimming in a round pond and is trying to escape from a cat that is running around the pond. What is the strategy that the mouse should apply to escape, considering that it swims at a quarter of the speed the cat runs?

Simon came up with his own code to recreate the simulation from the Numberphile video. In the four fragments I recorded, he showcases what he has built. Please ignore my silly questions, at the time of the recording I hadn’t viewed the Numberphile video yet and had no idea what the problem entailed.

Coding, In the Media, Machine Learning, Milestones, Murderous Maths, neural networks, Notes on everyday life, Set the beautiful mind free, Simon's Own Code

Interview with Simon on Repl.it

Repl.it has published a cool interview with Simon! It was interesting how Simon struggling to answer some of the more general questions gave me another glimpse into his beautiful mind that doesn’t tolerate crude dimensionality reductions. The first question, “If you could sum yourself up in one sentence, how would you do it?” really upset him, because he said he just couldn’t figure out a way to sum himself up in one sentence. This is precisely the same reason why Simon has had trouble performing trivial oral English exam tasks, like picking some items from the list and saying why he liked or disliked them. The way he sees the world, some things are simply unfathomable, or in any case, extremely complex, too complex to imagine one can sum them up in one sentence or come up with the chain of causes and consequences of liking something on the spot. He often tells me he sees the patterns, the details. Seeing objects or events in such complexity may mean it feels inappropriate, irresponsible, plain wrong to Simon to reduce those objects and events to a short string of characters.

This made me reflect upon how Simon keeps shaking me awake. I used to find nothing wrong with playing the reductionist game and frankly, had I been asked to sum myself up in one sentence, I would have readily come up with something like “a Russian journalist and a home educator”. It’s thanks to Simon that I am waking up to see how inaccurate that is. I begin to see how many games that we play in our society are forcing us to zoom out too far, to generalize too much. How often don’t we just plug something in, pretending we can answer impossible questions about the hugely complicated world around us and inside us! Well, Simon often honestly tells me that he just doesn’t have the answer.

For that first question in the interview, I suggested Simon answer something like “it’s more difficult to sum myself up in one sentence than to prove that e is irrational”, to which he replied: “But Mom, to prove that e is irrational is easy! It’s hard to prove that Pi is irrational!”

I must add that at the same time, Simon has really enjoyed the fact that Repl.it has written a developer spotlight about him as well as the social interaction on Twitter that the piece has initiated. It gave him a tangible sensation of belonging to the programming community, of being accepted and appreciated, and inspired him to work on his new projects in Repl.it.

Coding, Community Projects, Computer Science, Contributing, JavaScript, Murderous Maths, Physics, Simon's Own Code, Simon's sketch book

Simon’s Community Contribution: Variation of 2D Casting Coding Challenge in p5.js

This is Simon’s version of Daniel Shiffman’s 2D Casting code, made on Wednesday last week right after the live session. Link to the live session including the coding challenge.

Code and interactive animation are online at: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/ugHX4yKQC
Play with the animation online at:
https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/present/ugHX4yKQC
https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/full/ugHX4yKQC

Simon’s suggestions during a patron-only live session yesterday
a screenshot of Simon’s community contribution published on the Coding Train website

Simon has also made one more, optimized version of this project (with fewer rays, runs faster): https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/present/F6TCHAZs_
https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/F6TCHAZs_

Both of Simon’s versions have been added to the community contributions on the Coding Train website: https://thecodingtrain.com/CodingChallenges/145-2d-ray-casting.html

screenshot of the optimized version
Coding, Computer Science, Contributing, Group

Example of Simon contributing an issue on GitHub

Below is Simon’s issue/ topic suggestion he contributed to the Coding Train GitHub yesterday, addressed to Daniel Shiffman:

Function Overloading

Nah.

Operator Overloading

OK, first, we have to understand the valueOf() function. valueOf() is a function, that typically performs on a string, that converts it into a “primitive” data type.

A number is a primitive data type, because it’s not an object. And, you can see that by opening a Terminal window, running node and type:

> 2 + 2 // and get
4

Because JS doesn’t have any “real” overloading, you can’t put + in between two objects, in between two objects, and get an answer!

Well, with one slight exception, which is the valueOf() function. It will tell JS how to interpret an instance of an object as a primitive data type, whenever you want to add them together or something. If you put a valueOf() function into the prototype (or class, if you will) of an object, and it converts it into a number, or some other primitive data type, you can suddenly do arithmetic on these objects!

This does have a limitation, though. Say you write a class:

class Vector {
  constructor(x=0, y=0) {
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
  }

  // Maybe you want a valueOf() function to add them together
  valueOf() {
    // TL;DR What goes here???
  }
}

Maybe you want to add the individual components of a vector to add two vectors together.
It turns out, the answer is, nothing can go in the place of the question mark!

Here’s why: There’s no real primitive data type, with further components. That’s because that’s what a primitive data type is! It doesn’t have data, it is it’s own data! A Vector does have further components, however, and so we arrive at a contradiction. Because a vector has further components, and valueOf() must return something without further components, this situation is impossible!

String Overloading

Well, it’s really the same as Operator Overloading, except you need to use the toString() function instead of the valueOf() function. It converts it into a string. I don’t really know why you’d want to do this, maybe you would affect how you print it. I actually don’t even know if toString() can do this.

[TL;DR] Overloading

Look at this messy video about Matrix Math that you made: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NgZAIkDcPkI, at 23:15.

Guess what, there’s a way to fix that!

I don’t know how this one is called. When you say this, it’s an object. But, because objects are associative arrays, you can actually treat this as an associative array! Something like this:

class Matrix {
  constructor(rows, cols) {
    this.rows = rows;
    this.cols = cols;
    // this.data = []

    for (let i = 0; i < this.rows; i++) {
      this[i] = []; // OMG
      for (let j = 0; j < this.cols; j++) {
        this[i][j] = 0; // OMG
      }
    }
  }
  // .
  // .
  // .
}

It’s as easy as that!
If you want to, you could even add a this.length variable, and suddenly, you would even be able to iterate over it, with a for..of loop!

Coding, Computer Science, Experiments, Geometry Joys, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Simon's Own Code

Experimenting with random walks in Wolfram Mathematica

Simon’s code is published online at:
https://www.wolframcloud.com/objects/monajune0/Published/Random_walk_distribution.nb
https://www.wolframcloud.com/objects/monajune0/Published/Random_walk_distribution2D.nb

Experimenting with random walks in Wolfram Mathematica

“If I take many random walks and see what the endpoints of those random walks are, what I’ll find is a Gaussian distribution!” Simon says. In the video, he programs 1D and 2D random walks and 2D and 3D histograms to show the distribution of the endpoints​ in Wolfram Mathematica.

Coding, Coding Everywhere, Computer Science, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Python, RaspberryPi, Simon's Own Code, Simon's sketch book

Simon creates a playlist with Sorting Algorithms tutorials in Python

Simon’s chart of sorting algorithms ranked by efficiency

Simon has started a huge new project: a series of video tutorials about sorting algorithms. In the videos, he codes on his RaspberryPi, but here is the link to the Python code available on his GitHub page (that he continuously updates): https://gist.github.com/simon-tiger/5be70247a066f69c2578be5bb8e41e59

Today, Simon has recorded the fifth part of the series, in which he explains and applies the Quicksort algorithm. [The coding part goes very smoothly and much quicker (hehe) than in the previous sorting videos we have made so far. Simon also came up with his own code, he didn’t look the code up].

the quicksort video

And here come the previous parts of Simon’s sorting algorithms series, also available via this link to a playlist on his YouTube channel (there will be more videos coming):

the bubble sort video
the selection sort video
the insertion sort video (took Simon two days to make)
the merge sort video (was the most painful one)

Simon is also fascinated by more exotic sorting algorithms, such as a sorting network:

Simon used the following resources: Daniel Shiffman’s tutorial on Quicksort, Timo Bingmann’s sort algorithms visualization, Must Know Sorting Algorithms in Python, a medium blog on sorting algorithms, Brilliant.org’s computer science courses, Wikipedia.


Coding, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Simon's Own Code, Simon's sketch book

Multiplicative Persistence in Wolfram Mathematica

Simon has tried Matt Parker’s multiplicative persistence challenge on Numberphile: by multiplying all the digits in a large number, looking for the number of steps it takes to bring that large number to a single digit. Are there numbers that require 12 steps (have the multiplicative persistence of 12)?

Simon explaining the project

Simon has worked on this for two days, creating an interface in Wolfram Mathematica. He wrote the code to make the beautiful floral shapes above, they are actually graphs of how many steps three digit numbers take to get to single digit numbers (each ”flower” has the end result at its center).

What about the numbers with many more digits than three? Simon has tried writing code to look for the multiplicative persistence of really large numbers and also came up with some efficiencies, i.e. shortcuts in the search process. He did manage to find the persistence for 2^233 (the persistence was 2):


persistence for 2^233

However after he applied one of his efficiencies to the code to be able to search through many numbers at once, the code didn’t run anymore. You can read Simon’s page about this project and see his code here:

https://www.wolframcloud.com/objects/monajune0/Published/persistence.nb

Simon writes:

277777788888899 is the smallest number with a persistence of 11.
The largest known is 77777733332222222222222222222:

This code works with a few efficiencies:
1. They’ve already checked up to 10^233, so we don’t have to check those again.
2. We can rearrange the digits, and the multiplication will be the same. So we don’t have to check any of the rearrangements of any of the numbers we’ve already checked.
3 
3a. We should never put in a 0 (a digit of the number). Because then you would be multiplying by 0, which would result in 0 in 1 step!
3b. We should also never put in a 5 and an even number. Because, in the next step, the number would be divisible both by 5 and by 2, so it’s also divisible by 10. That would put a 0 in the answer, which we saw we should never do!
3c. With similar reasoning (assuming we want to find the smallest number of the type we want), we’ll see we should never put in:
– Two 5s
– A 5 and a 7
– When we put in a… (- means anything, the order doesn’t matter):
1,- , remove the 1
2,2, put 4 instead
2,3, put 6 instead
2,4, put 8 instead
3,3, put 9 instead
So, we can reduce the search space and time collossaly, with just some logic!

Coding, Logic, Machine Learning, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Simon's Own Code

Domain Coloring with Complex Functions in Wolfram Mathematica

Simon has been completely carried away by Wolfram Mathematica. He keeps starting new projects, just to try something out. After working on his Knot Theory book for days, and making beautiful illustrations in Wolfram, he switched over to domain coloring. The images below are some impressions of his experimenting with the color function. He hasn’t applied the complex function yet.

Another new project he started has been Poisson disc sampling.

“Wolfram is the most advanced language! It has most built-in stuff in it! At Wolfram, they are working so hard, that the knowledge base is changing every second!” Simon screams out as he pauses the Elementary Introduction to Wolfram Language book (he was reading it at first and now binge watches it as a series of video tutorials). Simon has been especially blown away by the free-form linguistic input: “From plane English it somehow computes the results and maybe even native Mathematica Syntax!” Wolfram also “has an entire section which is machine learning!”

Simon has started a free trial about a week ago, but I guess we’re buying a subscription.

Starting out
Only brightness left to do
Color function done