Coding, English and Text-Based Data, Python, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code

It takes the sun to the ground, and violet on the observer’s eye.

Simon writes:

This amazing sentence is generated by a Markov Text-Generation Algorithm. What is a Markov Algorithm? Simply put, it generates the rules from a source text, and it generates a new text that also follows those rules. The rules are often called the Markov Blanket, and the new text is also called the Markov Chain. OK, how does this all work?

Let’s take an example: let’s consider the source text to be “Hello, world!”. Then we pick a number called the order. The higher the number, the more sense the text makes. We’ll pick 1 for the first examples, we’ll examine what happens with higher numbers later.

Then we generate the Markov Blanket. This is a deterministic process. We start from the beginning: “H”. So we put H in our Markov Blanket. Then we come across “e”. So we put e in our Markov Blanket, but to specify that it’s next from H, we connect H to e by an arrow. Then we stumble on “l”. So we put l in our Markov Blanket, but again, to specify that it’s next from e, we connect e to l by an arrow.

Now, here’s where it gets interesting. What’s next? Well, it’s “l” again. So now we connect l to itself, by an arrow. This is interesting because it’s no longer a straight line!

And we keep going. Once we’re done, our Markov Blanket will look something like this:

Once we’ve created our Markov Blanket, then we start generating the Markov Chain from it. Unlike the Markov Blanket, generating the Markov Chain is a stochastic process.

This is just a process of wandering about the Markov Blanket, and noting down where we go. One way to do this, is just to start from the beginning, and follow the path. And whenever we come across some sort of fork, we just spin a wheel to see where we go next. For example, here are some possible Markov Chains:

Held!
Helld!
Hellld!
Helorld!
Hello, world!
Helllo, wo, wo, world!

That was an easy one, so let’s do something more complex with code.

First, just an interface to enter in the text, and the order:

text = "" # Variable to hold the text

print("Type your text here (type END to end it):")

while True:
  line = input("") # Read a line of text from standard input
  if line != "END": text += line + "\n" # If we didn't enter END, add that line to the text
  else: break # If we entered END, signify that the text has ended

text = text[:len(text)-1] # Remove the last line break

order = int(input('Type the order (how much it makes sense) here: '))

input("Generate me a beautiful text") # Just to make it dramatic, print this message, and ask the user to hit ENTER to proceed

Next, the Markov Blanket. Here, we store it in a dictionary, and store every possible next letter in a list:

def markov_blanket(text, order):
  result = {} # The Markov Blanket

  for i in range(len(text) - order + 1): # For every n-gram
    ngram = ""
    for off in range(order):
      ngram += text[i+off]
    
    if not ngram in result: # If we didn't see it yet
      result[ngram] = []
    if i < len(text) - order: # If we didn't reach the end
      result[ngram].append(text[i+order]) # Add the next letter as a possibility
  
  return result # Give the result back

Huh? What is this code?

This is what happens when we pick a number >1. Then, instead of making the Markov Blanket for every character, you make it for every couple of characters.

For example, if we pick 2, then we make the Markov Blanket for the 1st and 2nd letter, the 2nd and 3rd, the 3rd and 4th, the 4th and 5th, and so on. When we generate the Markov Chain, we squash the ngrams that we visit together. So next, the Markov Chain:

def markov_chain(blanket):
  keys = blanket.keys()
  ngram = random.choice(list(keys)) # Starting Point
  new_text = ngram
  while True:
    try:
      nxt = random.choice(blanket[ngram]) # Choose a next letter
      new_text += nxt # Add it to the text
      ngram += nxt # Add it to the ngram and remove the 1st character
      ngram = ngram[1:]
    except IndexError: # If we can't choose a next letter, maybe because there is none
      break
  return new_text # Give the result back

# Now that we know how to do the whole thing, do the whole thing!
new_text = markov_chain(markov_blanket(text, order), num)
print(new_text) # Print the new text out

OK, now let’s run this:

Type your text here (type END to end it):
A rainbow is a meteorological phenomenon that is caused by reflection, refraction and dispersion of light in water droplets resulting in a spectrum of light appearing in the sky. It takes the form of a multicoloured circular arc. Rainbows caused by sunlight always appear in the section of sky directly opposite the sun.
Rainbows can be full circles. However, the observer normally sees only an arc formed by illuminated droplets above the ground, and centered on a line from the sun to the observer's eye.
In a primary rainbow, the arc shows red on the outer part and violet on the inner side. This rainbow is caused by light being refracted when entering a droplet of water, then reflected inside on the back of the droplet and refracted again when leaving it.
In a double rainbow, a second arc is seen outside the primary arc, and has the order of its colours reversed, with red on the inner side of the arc. This is caused by the light being reflectedtwice on the inside of the droplet before leaving it.
END
Type the order (how much it makes sense) here: 5
Generate me a beautiful text

And……..it..stops.

Why did it do that?

You see, this is not such a good method. What if our program generated a Markov Blanket that didn’t have an end? Well, our program wouldn’t even get to the end, and it would just wander around and around and around, and never give us a result! Or even if it did, it would be infinite!

So how do we avoid this?

Well, we set another much bigger number , let’s say 5000, to be a callout value. If we don’t get to the end within 5000 steps, we give up and output early. Let’s run this again…

And now, it doesn’t stop anymore! Snippets of example generated text:

It takes the sun to the ground, and violet on the observer’s eye.

This rainbow, a second arc formed by illuminated droplets resulting it.
In a primary rainbow is a meteorological phenomenon the back of the ground, and has the sky. It takes the order of its coloured circles. However, the sun.

Rainbow, a second arc shows red on a line from the section of light in water droplet and has the sun.

In a double rainbow is caused by illuminated droplet on the outer part and refracted when leaving in a spectrum of a multicoloured circles. However, the droplet of water droplets resulting it.
In a double rainbow is a meteorological phenomenon the droplets resulting in a spectrum of a multicoloured circular arc. Rainbow is caused by the inner side the observer’s eye

Play with this project online at: https://repl.it/@simontiger/Markov-Text

Coding, JavaScript, Murderous Maths, Physics, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code, Simon's sketch book

Heat Equation Visualization

A visual solution to Fourier’s heat equation in p5. Play with the two versions online:
https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/present/EaHr9886H
https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/EaHr9886H

https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/present/ruN8CQV77
https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/ruN8CQV77

Inspired by 3Blue1Brown’s Differential Equations series.

Coding, Math Riddles, Math Tricks, Murderous Maths, Python

Number Guessing Game

Simon writes: Made a little game where the computer thinks of a number 1-100, and you try to guess it within 7 takes! Hint: the algorithm is called “Binary Search”. https://repl.it/@simontiger/NumberGuessingGame
You can also play the fullscreen version here: https://numberguessinggame.simontiger.repl.run/

Now also a reversed version, where you think of a number and the computer guesses it: https://repl.it/@simontiger/BinaryNumGuessingGame

Coding, Computer Science, JavaScript, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code, Simon's sketch book

Back to the sorting algorithms: Beadsort (and a short lecture about the generator function)

Link to the project: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/7gLA0u4KF
Made my Beadsort step-by-step with a generator function! https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/full/ilZXV9Dp0 (Scroll down to see the “Next” button!) Code: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/ilZXV9Dp0
The video also contains a bonus tutorial about what a generator function is!
Coding, Computer Science, English and Text-Based Data, Python, Simon teaching

Encoding and Cracking Codes in Python

Had great fun learning how to crack codes using Python! Simon is currently following the Programming with Python course on Brilliant.org and showed me how to see whether an encrypted piece is gibberish or a real text is hidden behind it.

Simon writes:

A Caesar Shift is a simple cipher, which was a standard in Roman times. It works like this: shift every character by some fixed amount in the alphabet. Something like this:

Example: Suppose some professor writes his name on his board:

ES. TNJUI

It’s encoded with a caesar shift. Because it’s a professor’s name, it probably starts with “Dr.”, so it’s probably a shift that turns D into E, and R into S. So we can work backwards from that shift, and get:

DR. SMITH

That was an easy one, so let’s do something more complex with code.

One of the messages below is a real text, encoded using a Caesar Shift, the other one is just a random sequence of letters. Can you tell which one is which?

Text 1:
yfdpcpoplhhwdpssbjnsqvtlcpzpxqugtjphvgotuvwxufgoqigxwgkskduooyeuoue
fjlnmsqpgxrmcseeliswdheywseqgcbeothskxdzekgxmmkildjnaqbukprpfaaknsu
qpdwayqaqfxsoapvsgreqydqjnkpjghvrkygtidzibhrqkmocukhcunpjcazzvomtsc
fgycwfltmiegaejwcqrgsnxxcbtcrckufwsdxdhbxgppxcuzapbdhftzmugryfseavv
bssqlxanvmfwwzityziixasivzkmvtfczqmdgkabcnjbyhaoealengfptuedlmvryeb
titbwqkekzdpmbtiphdkwwiduassvbgalxgrfhrjrjplxpujrprqzcpcdqsjorigazt
kwwlnwbjryrzhgcttroyemuwwixwufymnknirzmexyowobvardlqktzajzoijwulomg
ztefdpftjealzapcgipgaaspuzxklvd
Text 2:
swodkdbkfovvobpbywkxkxdsaeovkxngrycksndgyfkcdkxndbexuvoccvoqcypcdyx
ocdkxnsxdronocobdxokbdrowyxdrockxnrkvpcexukcrkddobonfsckqovsocgrycop
bygxkxngbsxuvonvszkxncxoobypmyvnmywwkxndovvdrkdsdccmevzdybgovvdrycoz
kccsyxcbokngrsmriodcebfsfocdkwzonyxdrocovspovoccdrsxqcdrorkxndrkdwym
uondrowkxndrorokbddrkdponkxnyxdrozonocdkvdrocogybnckzzokbwixkwoscyji
wkxnskcusxqypusxqcvyyuyxwigybuciowsqrdikxnnoczksbxydrsxqlocsnobowksx
cbyexndronomkiypdrkdmyvycckvgbomulyexnvocckxnlkbodrovyxokxnvofovckxn
ccdbodmrpkbkgki

Simon has explained a way to see whether the encrypted piece contains meaningful (real) text: one can plot the frequency of each letter as it’s used in the encrypted piece. If all letters have generally similar frequency, it’s not a real text, because in real texts, certain letters are encountered much more often than others. Below are the frequency plots Simon made for the texts above, using a Python package called matplotlib:

Frequencies for text 1:

Frequencies for text 2:

As you can see, the second plot depicts a greater variety in frequencies. “For example, o appears the most, but g does not appear that much. And t does not appear at all!” Simon showed me.

As it turned out, we could actually use our knowledge about which letters naturally appear more frequently in English-language texts to crack the code! “Which letter is the most frequent one in English writing?” Simon asked me. “Letter e!” I guessed. “So now we know that the letter o in the encrypted text stands for e in the real text!” Simon exclaimed. “All we have to do to decode it now is simply shift the letters by 10 letters back, because e is 10 letters behind the o!”

Simon Writes:

So, what is the message about? Simon tweaked Brilliant’s code to make sure it shifted by the amount of 10…

imetatravellerfromanantiquelandwhosaidtwovastandtrunklesslegsofstonestandinthedesertnearthemonthesandhalfsunkashatteredvisagelieswhosefrownandwrinkledlipandsneerofcoldcommandtellthatitssculptorwellthosepassionsreadwhichyetsurvivestampedontheselifelessthingsthehandthatmockedthemandtheheartthatfedandonthepedestalthesewordsappearmynameisozymandiaskingofkingslookonmyworksyemightyanddespairnothingbesideremainsroundthedecayofthatcolossalwreckboundlessandbaretheloneandlevelsandsstretchfaraway

…put the spaces and punctuation in appropriately…

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: “Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert . . . Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed:
And on the pedestal these words appear:
‘My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!’
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.”

So, it’s about Archeology! This is the poem Ozymandias by Percy Shelley (1818).

Source Code

Encoder / Decoder:

alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"

# convert between letters and numbers up to 26
def number_to_letter(i):
    return alphabet[i%26]

def letter_to_number(l):
    return alphabet.find(l)

# How to encode a single character (letter or not)
def caesar_shift_single_character(l, amount):
    i = letter_to_number(l)
    if i == -1: # character not found in alphabet:
        return "" # remove it, it's spaces or punctuation
    else:
        return number_to_letter(i + amount) # Caesar shift

# How to encode a full text
def caesar_shift(text, amount):
    shifted_text = ""
    for char in text.lower(): # also convert uppercase letters to lowercase
        shifted_text += caesar_shift_single_character(char, amount)
    return shifted_text

### MAIN PROGRAM ###

message = """
paste the text here
"""

code = caesar_shift(message, 2)
print(code)

Code for Plots:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"

code = """
paste the text here
"""

letter_counts = [code.count(l) for l in alphabet]
letter_colors = plt.cm.hsv([0.8*i/max(letter_counts) for i in letter_counts])

plt.bar(range(26), letter_counts, color=letter_colors)
plt.xticks(range(26), alphabet) # letter labels on x-axis
plt.tick_params(axis="x", bottom=False) # no ticks, only labels on x-axis
plt.title("Frequency of each letter")
plt.savefig("output.png")
art, Coding, Crafty, JavaScript, Simon's Own Code, Together with sis

Slitscan and Edge Detection in p5.js

Simon writes:

Made a cool #slitscan effect you all can play with: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/full/Xr8F_KmnU

Code here: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/Xr8F_KmnU

I have actually figured out the appropriate way to move the image of the webcam such that the resulting trail produces a slitscan!

Simon writes: (The second pic is also me, doing sit-ups :))
Simon’s sister playing with the slitscan effect
Simon has also created a nice edge detection effect, allowing for video images to look like they were traced in pencil
Coding, Community Projects, Contributing, Notes on everyday life, Python, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code, Together with sis

Drawing with Turtle

Here we are, on the day of my 40th birthday, while recording a lesson of drawing with turtle in Python. It was meant to be my birthday present, a beginner-friendly hour of code, in which Neva would also be able to take an active part. We ended up recording two beautiful sessions only to find out later that our screen capture video was irreparably corrupted (never record in mp4 in OBS). Simon was inconsolable. We also thought this webcam recording was gone but rediscovered it a day later. So nice to have it as a memory.

And I’m relieved to say that we have managed to redo the whole project from scratch today (sadly without Neva’s participation this time as she had better things to do, so I look rather redundant sitting there next to Simon giving the lesson). Once Simon is done with the editing (which is another two days of work I’m afraid), he will upload the hour of code on YouTube. He also plans to create a website for this project to enable his “students” to draw in a built-in application.

From our session today:

And here is an example of Simon drawing with turtle for his own pleasure, a Serpinski triangle in Python (a few days ago):

Coding, JavaScript, Math Riddles, Murderous Maths, Simon makes gamez, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code

Cat and Mouse

This is a project that Simon started a few weeks ago but never finished, so I think it’s time I archive it here. It’s based upon this wonderful Numberphile video, in which Ben Sparks shows a curious math problem – a game of cat and mouse – in a computer simulation he’d built. The setting is that the mouse is swimming in a round pond and is trying to escape from a cat that is running around the pond. What is the strategy that the mouse should apply to escape, considering that it swims at a quarter of the speed the cat runs?

Simon came up with his own code to recreate the simulation from the Numberphile video. In the four fragments I recorded, he showcases what he has built. Please ignore my silly questions, at the time of the recording I hadn’t viewed the Numberphile video yet and had no idea what the problem entailed.

Coding, In the Media, Machine Learning, Milestones, Murderous Maths, neural networks, Notes on everyday life, Set the beautiful mind free, Simon's Own Code

Interview with Simon on Repl.it

Repl.it has published a cool interview with Simon! It was interesting how Simon struggling to answer some of the more general questions gave me another glimpse into his beautiful mind that doesn’t tolerate crude dimensionality reductions. The first question, “If you could sum yourself up in one sentence, how would you do it?” really upset him, because he said he just couldn’t figure out a way to sum himself up in one sentence. This is precisely the same reason why Simon has had trouble performing trivial oral English exam tasks, like picking some items from the list and saying why he liked or disliked them. The way he sees the world, some things are simply unfathomable, or in any case, extremely complex, too complex to imagine one can sum them up in one sentence or come up with the chain of causes and consequences of liking something on the spot. He often tells me he sees the patterns, the details. Seeing objects or events in such complexity may mean it feels inappropriate, irresponsible, plain wrong to Simon to reduce those objects and events to a short string of characters.

This made me reflect upon how Simon keeps shaking me awake. I used to find nothing wrong with playing the reductionist game and frankly, had I been asked to sum myself up in one sentence, I would have readily come up with something like “a Russian journalist and a home educator”. It’s thanks to Simon that I am waking up to see how inaccurate that is. I begin to see how many games that we play in our society are forcing us to zoom out too far, to generalize too much. How often don’t we just plug something in, pretending we can answer impossible questions about the hugely complicated world around us and inside us! Well, Simon often honestly tells me that he just doesn’t have the answer.

For that first question in the interview, I suggested Simon answer something like “it’s more difficult to sum myself up in one sentence than to prove that e is irrational”, to which he replied: “But Mom, to prove that e is irrational is easy! It’s hard to prove that Pi is irrational!”

I must add that at the same time, Simon has really enjoyed the fact that Repl.it has written a developer spotlight about him as well as the social interaction on Twitter that the piece has initiated. It gave him a tangible sensation of belonging to the programming community, of being accepted and appreciated, and inspired him to work on his new projects in Repl.it.