Computer Science, Crafty, Electronics, Engineering, Good Reads, Milestones, Simon's sketch book

Simon trying to build a 8-bit computer in circuit simulators

As some of you may know, Simon is working on building a real-life 8-bit computer from scratch, guided by Ben Eater’s tutorials (it’s a huge project that may takes months). He has also been enchanted by the idea to build the computer in a simulator as well, researching all virtual environments possible. The best simulator Simon has tried so far has been Circuitverse.org, although he did stumble upon a stack overflow error once, approximately half-way through (maybe the memory wasn’t big enough for such an elaborate circuit, Simon said). You can view Simon’s projects on Circuitverse here: https://circuitverse.org/users/7241

Link to the project that ended up having a stack overflow: https://circuitverse.org/users/7241/projects/21712

And here is a link to Simon’s new and more successful attempt to put together a SAP-1 (simple as possible) processor (work in progress), something he has been reading about in his new favourite book, the Digital Computer Electronics eBook (third edition): https://circuitverse.org/users/7241/projects/22541

https://circuitverse.org/users/7241/projects/21712
the register
the RAM
https://circuitverse.org/users/7241/projects/22541

Simon has also tried building an 8-bit computer in Simulator.io, but it was really difficult and time consuming:

Version in simulator.io

The next hopeful candidate was the Virtual Breadboard desktop app for pc. Simon downloaded it about ten times from the Microsoft store but it somehow never arrived, most probably because our Windows version was slightly outdated but who knows.

And finally, Simon has also discovered Fritzing.org, an environment for creating your own pcbs with a real-life look. He may attempt actually making a hardcopy SAP-1 via Fritzing after he’s done with the Ben Eater project. Conclusion: sticking with Circuitverse for the time being.

Computer Science, Electronics, Engineering, Good Reads, Notes on everyday life, Uncategorized

The Digital Computer Electronics book

Simon has been mesmerised by this book for a couple of days by now, the Digital Computer Electronics eBook (third edition). He has downloaded it online and has been reading about the so called “simple as possible” processors or the sap’s (he loves the name) one of which is like the 8-bit computer he is currently trying to build from scratch.

Simon reading the book in the playroom. I hear him laughing and reading aloud.
a screenshot of the book
Taking notes on SAP-2 instructions (and listening to a quiz show on YouTube at the same time) – his way of learning
Computer Science, Crafty, Electricity, Electronics, Engineering, Logic, Milestones, motor skills, Simon teaching

Simon building an 8-bit Computer from scratch. Parts 1 & 2.

Parts 1 and 2 in Simon’s new series showing him attempting to build an 8-bit computer from scratch, using the materials from Ben Eater’s Complete 8-bit breadboard computer kit bundle.

Simon is learning this from Ben Eater’s playlist about how to build an 8-bit computer.

In Part 1, Simon builds the clock for the computer
In Part 2, Simon builds the A register (more registers to follow).
these little black things are an inverter (6 in one pack), AND gate and OR gate (4 AND and OR gates in one pack)
this schematic represents the clock of the future 8-bit computer
Simon and Neva thought the register with its LED lights resembled a birthday cake
Electricity, Electronics, Logic, Simon teaching

Simon has been bitten by the hardware bug again!

It’s all Ben Eater‘s fault! Simon is more of a software and pure math champion, but Ben Eater’s videos have sparked Simon’s interest in logic and electronics, anew. Back in mid July (yes, I know, I’m a little behind with the blog), while waiting for his Complete 8-bit breadboard computer kit bundle to arrive from the US, Simon was playing with virtual circuits that he built on two wonderful platforms: Circuitverse.org and Logic.ly. You can view Simon’s page on Circuitverse at https://circuitverse.org/users/7241

Simon’s favourite was building the Master-Slave JK Flip-Flop https://circuitverse.org/simulator/edit/20037

Simon gave me a whole lecture on the differences between Sequential and Combinational Logic: in the former, there’s a presence of a feedback loop (the output actually goes back to somewhere else in the circuit), and the latter has everything going in one direction (the inputs come in and the outputs go out).

It’s a little bit like the difference between a Feed Forward neural network where the output only depends on the input and a recurrent neural network where the output also depends on what the output was previously,

Simon explained.

Here’s a problem with sequential logic circuits: they go crazy like this very often (confused NOR gate). That’s why most sequential logic circuits have a clock in them. A clock acts like a delay so that it won’t go crazy.

That’s the power of sequential logic: you can have the same input but a different output. This is useful for storing data: I release the input, but the data is stored. It can only be archived in sequential logic.

The delay comes in error detection (on the rising edge of the square wave).

Master-Slave JK Flip-Flop
https://circuitverse.org/simulator/edit/20037

The following circuits are buit in Logicly https://logic.ly/demo

SR Latch in Logic.ly
D Flip-Flop
SR Flip-Flop
Master-Slave JK Flip-Flop
Simon building circuits together with his uncle whom he has met for the first time (Russian)
chemistry, Crafty, Experiments, Together with sis

MEL Chemistry Experiments: Making Batteries

We did two more experiments a couple days ago: Liquid Wires (creating a simple circuit using graphite and liquid glass, a sodium silicate solution) and making our own Zinc-Carbon Battery, a chemical source of electric current that relies on an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction between manganese dioxide (MnO2) and zinc (Zn). 

A redox reaction involves the transfer of electrons from one element (the reducer) to another element (the oxidizer).

Our battery is divided into two sections, separated by wadding: one section holds the oxidizer MnO2 and the other contains the reductant Zn. When the crocodile clips are connected to a diode, the circuit is closed and the reaction can begin: electrons start migrating from the zinc section to the manganese section (manganese dioxide mixed with graphite o make it a better conductor). We used ammonium chloride NH4Cl as the electrolyte.

Arduino, Coding, Electricity, Electronics

Arduino to relax

Last week Simon suddenly unpacked his old electronics sets and completed several projects with Arduino, his old single-board friend that got him into coding a little over a year ago. Back then it was the most difficult stuff he had ever tried, his first “setups”and “draws”, his first dive into serious circuits. Now Arduino (and iCircuit) is something he does while taking breaks from the real studying/ coding. Amazing how skillful he has become in assembling the circuits, too. All those little wires. Especially considering he still isn’t an expert at tying his shoelaces.

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Coding, Electricity, Electronics, Physics

Back to circuits

Yesterday Simon asked me to buy new electronics software he found on the internet. It’s a realtime circuit simulator and editor called iCircuit. Simon has already built several circuits in it last night and there is so much more to discover. He was following Derek Banas’ tutorials on electronics.

Coding, Electricity, Electronics, Lego

Lego WeDo

After he tried it during a Digisnacks group session last month Simon really wanted to have his own Lego WeDo set. The waiting seemed endless, Sinterklaas lost the parcel once and worried if it would reach Simon on time, but in the end everything worked out magically well. And even though the drag and drop programming seems to be too easy for Simon, we enjoy watching him complete the laborious projects all by himself. He didn’t use to be this dexterous with the tiny Lego pieces just a few months ago, his fine motor skills are improving by the day. In fact his piano teacher just told me exactly the same thing about his piano fingers yesterday.

 

 

 

 

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Crafty, Electricity, Electronics, Soldering, Together with sis

Conductive Painting

We made a talking poster with Bare Conductive paint and touch board today:

 

The poster on the wall next to Simon’s room:

 

This is how we made it. We taped a stencil to a large sheet of white paper and applied the conductive paint, then waited for the paint to dry.

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While waiting, we loaded several mp3 files on to the MicroSD card that came with the touch board. Simon made sure the files were named in the right order, to correspond to the correct electrodes on the touch board. We found the sound files at FreeSound.org:

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Simon placed the MiscroSD back into the touch board:

We carefully removed the stencil, this was the result:

We attached the touch board and the speaker to the poster, then cold soldered the holes in the electrodes with conductive paint.

Let it dry and turn the power on!