Coding, Community Projects, Contributing, Curent Events, Experiments, Geography, JavaScript, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Philosophy, Simon makes gamez, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code, Simon's sketch book, Social Studies, Thoughts about the world

How Can Math Help Resolve Racial Segregation?

This is Simon’s contribution to #blacklivesmatter

How Can Math Help Resolve Racial Segregation? This video and coding project is based on Segregation Solitaire by Thomas Schelling, an American mathematician and economist who was awarded the 2005 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for “having enhanced our understanding of conflict and cooperation through game-theory analysis.”

I don’t like the name ‘Segregation Solitaire’, so I call it Schelling’s Game. This is also inspired by the famous Parable of the Polygons playable essay on the shape of society by Vi Hart and Nicky Case: https://ncase.me/polygons/

Simon binge reads Nicky Case’s essays and has made several remixes of their projects, all the more timely, considering today’s context.

Simon’s interactive version: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/present/mWwl1GsTe

Simon’s code: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/mWwl1GsTe

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Simon’s remix of one of Nicky Case’s playable essays

If you’re interested in why #covid-19 tracing apps are important and the most privacy-friendly way to implement them, please read this interactive essay by Nicky Case and play with the colorful simulations of all our possible futures. For Simon, this has been the entrance into the Nicky Case @ncasenmare universe (first recommended by 3Blue1Brown). Simon has been gulping down the playable essays on human networks and the spread of complex ideas, self-synchronization in nature, the shape of society and several other burning themes (like coming out and anxiety) and watching Nicky Case’s talks, like this one. Nicky is a self-made indie artist, programmer and writer making very edgy, very 21st century multimedia products that are both profound in content and have an engaging/interactive interface. It’s as if reading an informative piece is turned into a game. And that’s exactly what Nicky stands for: learning through play and messing about. Maybe that’s why Simon has embraced his works so eagerly, Nicky has proven to be one of those perfect matches for our self-directed learning style.

Simon has made a remix of Nicky’s Evolution of Trust, an iterated prisoner’s dilemma: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/present/oOurTdGWT

Simon’s code: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/oOurTdGWT

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Math and Game Theory Outside

Since mid-March, all playgrounds have been closed in Belgium, so we’ve been left with simply taking walks, first at the park and then, after we were no longer allowed to drive anywhere for leisure, at the port of Antwerp (within 2km from our home). Simon usually gets bored simply taking a walk, so he comes up with something every time to keep our weekly outings exciting (like teaching Neva a random walk algorithm using plastic coins (that decided where we turn next) or playing the game of chicken (something we have read about in a Game Theory book).

Coding, Computer Science, Experiments, JavaScript, Logic, Murderous Maths, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book

Nash Equilibrium

Simon explaining the Nash Equilibrium with a little game in p5.js. Play it yourself at: https://editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/lfP4dKGCs
Inspired by TedEd video Why do competitors open their stores next to one another? by Jac de Haan.