Hero Game in Processing. Simon’s Own Code.

Hero Game 24 Jul 2017 High Score

Simon has created a great new game in Processing: The Hero Game! It is somewhat like the good old Mario, except that Simon has no idea what Mario is and came up with the concept himself. The game is based upon Circle-Rectangle Intersection, something that he was studying for the past several days. It was impressive to see how quickly he wrote the program for the game, I think it took him something like an hour, while waiting for dinner. The game has a hero (Simon), represented by the yellow circle, obstacles (from below and above) and money that the hero collects to get points. The game stops once the hero hits an obstacle. Simon is planning to add extra random obstacles and maybe also create a winning score threshold (around 50 or 65, he says). His own highest score so far has been 35.

Below are the making-of videos, step by step:

 

 

 

 

 

Update: Simon added trees!

Hero Game 24 Jul 2017 Tree 2

Evolutionary Steering Behaviors Game

Note: See the update at the bottom of this post!

We’ve had quite a dramatic situation here for the past couple of days, after Simon turned Daniel Shiffman’s Evolutionary Steering Behaviors Coding Challenge into a game in Processing (Java) and then also in JavaScript (with p5). After completing the game in JavaScript, Simon wanted to add a new feature – a checkbox he programmed using the p5.js library. The checkbox would give the player the option to play with or without the timer, adjust the timer and also had a “New game” button. In the end it turned out that the checkbox didn’t really work. Simon was very upset and it took me hours to talk him into putting the game online even though the checkbox didn’t function (he wanted everything to be perfect) and ask for advice. “I have got a problem with a p5 element: In my setup function, I defined my checkbox. In my reset function, my checkbox is undefined. Why?” – Simon asked in the “Share Work” section of the Coding Train Slack channel, where he has the opportunity to communicate with experienced programmers. He received quite a lot of help and was enthusiastic about it at first, but for some reason, he hasn’t tried the solutions he was suggested. Perhaps it’s his gut feeling that the bind function suggested is still too difficult at the moment. I have decided not to push anymore and trust him on this one, although it’s always a dilemma for me whether I should sometimes “force” him into taking instructions from others or let him solely rely on his fantastic intrinsic autodidact mechanisms. The second seems to work better in terms of the learning process, but I do push him into sharing his work.

Evolutionary Steering Behaviors game. Asking help in Slack 10 Jul 2017 3Evolutionary Steering Behaviors game. Asking help in Slack 10 Jul 2017 4Evolutionary Steering Behaviors game. Asking help in Slack 10 Jul 2017 5Evolutionary Steering Behaviors game. Asking help in Slack 10 Jul 2017 6Evolutionary Steering Behaviors game. Asking help in Slack 10 Jul 2017 7Evolutionary Steering Behaviors game. Asking help in Slack 10 Jul 2017 8

Evolutionary Steering Behaviors game. Asking help in Slack 10 Jul 2017 2

Simon’s game is online at: https://simon-tiger.github.io/Game_SteeringBehaviorsEvolution/SteeringBehaviours_EvolutionGame_p5/

In the videos below Simon shows how he made the game. It’s an ecosystem type of genetic algorithm (with no generations), where the organisms (autonomous steering agents) clone themselves. The autonomous steering agents evolve the behavior of eating food (green dots) and avoiding poison (red dots). Simon added two invaders into the game, one giving food and the other randomly spreading poison. The player can control the “good” invader by moving him and making new food. The goal of the game is to make the agents survive for as long as possible.

The Processing (Java) version:

The thinking behind the game (Simon explains everything at the whiteboard):

The JavaScript version (now online):

In the last video, Simon talks about his problem with the p5 element.

 

Evolutionary Steering Behaviors game seek algorithm part 1. DESIRED equals TARGET minus POSITION:

Evolutionary Steering Behaviors game seek algorithm part 1. DESIRED equals TARGET minus POSITION 4 Jul 2017

Evolutionary Steering Behaviors game seek algorithm part 2. STEERING equals DESIRED minus VELOCITY:

Evolutionary Steering Behaviors game seek algorithm part 2. STEERING equals DESIRED minus VELOCITY 10 Jul 2017

UPDATE: When Simon saw Daniel Shiffman’s comment on Slack this morning (Daniel saying Simon did a fantastic job and that he might even include Simon’s game in the next Live Stream), he sat down and applied the bind function as suggested by his older peers above – without any incentive on my behalf! And it worked! I think we’ve hit a true milestone again. Simon has this growing feeling that he’s got friends out there, his tribe, who understand and who are ready to help.

One day later: Simon had another chat with his friends on Slack and got a lot of help with the last remaining small bug in his game (the New Game button didn’t start a new game if the player had chosen to play with no timer but jumped to Game Over instead). In the video below, Simon shows how that problem got solved:

Plinko game translated into Processing (Java) and Box2D

Simon translated Daniel Shiffman’s Plinko game coding challenge from JavaScript and Matter.JS into Processing (Java) and Box2D:

Simon adds that he didn’t actually do part 4 of the coding challenge, because part 3 is recorded after part 4.

Simon’s Plinko

 

Simon loved Daniel Shiffman’s simulation of the Plinko game and added some extra features to Daniel’s code, like a button to make new chips appear. He also saw a television version of Plinko where people were trying to win money, so he added the figures below to indicate your score.

Simon put this project on GitHub, too!

Code: https://github.com/simon-tiger/plinko

Direct link to the game: https://simon-tiger.github.io/plinko/

You can also both the code and play with the animation via the p5.js web editor (hit Download to get the animation on your computer): http://alpha.editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/Sk23OkW6x

Asteroids Coding Challenge

Simon has built this fun Atari game where a spaceship shoots at asteroids with laser and breaks them down into pieces. It was actually another coding challenge by Daniel Shiffman that Simon had tried a couple months ago when he was just beginning to write code. Back then he got seriously stuck at the asteroids phase (using JavaScript and HTML5 canvas with the p5.js library to program the “laser” functionality and examine collision detection with the asteroids). This time around, however, he glided through the challenge, nearly effortlessly, in his own words. He did enjoy it immensely and even tried rebuilding it on the RaspberryPi, but had “a copy-paste issue”.

The code in online in the p5.js web editor. You can run it and play the game, you can also hit the Download button and play on a big screen!

http://alpha.editor.p5js.org/simontiger/sketches/r16tcHq3e