Geometry Joys, Math and Computer Science Everywhere, Math Riddles, Math Tricks, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book

Some more miscellaneous impressions of Simon’s math-related adventures

a math trick based on probability and proof (presented to me while putting his pyjamas on one December evening)
the first thing he wrote on his new mini-whiteboard after getting it for Sinterklaas
while reading Stephen Wolfram’s A New Kind of Science
area of a hexagon
finding proof for puzzle solution
generally doing a lot of math with his little sister, like calcdocus in this picture
teaching mathematical concepts and solving problems to entertain family and friends
Coding, Community Projects, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Simon makes gamez, Simon's Own Code

Tantrix Game in JavaScript

Simon talking about his Tantrix Game code and the math behind it. It has been Simon’s first community project, many thanks to everyone who has contributed hexagonal tiles for the game! The game isn’t finished yet, but the video gives a good insight into the work in progress. Simon will finish it at a later date he says. Feel free to try and finish it on your own and share your results! The code is on GitHub at: https://github.com/simon-tiger/tantrix

This is a separate link to see what Simon has got so far in action: https://simon-tiger.github.io/tantrix/tantrix/

 

Below is Simon’s original YouTube post summoning contributions:

Coding, Geometry Joys, JavaScript, Physics, Simon's Own Code

Soft Springs (Simon’s own code)

Simon used Chapter 3 (Oscillation) of Daniel Shiffman’s book The Nature of Code as the theoretical basis for creating his own code. First, he played around with what he calls “soft springs” – multiple spring arrays connecting multiple particles (some of them locked but most of them moving) – allowing for most interesting designs thanks to spring force.

Simon called the video below “a mess” that “doesn’t look promising”, but to me it’s my favourite pattern. To me it resembles a constructivist poster turned alive, something like an El Lissitzky animation:

Other soft springs step by step (Simon explains what soft springs are in the first video):

Simon eventually stepped over t trying to create sets of springs and particles that unfold into certain geometrical shapes, like a trapezoid here:

And finally, a hexagon: