Biology, Murderous Maths

The All Common Ancestors Generation

This project is a simulation of how many people can stem from the same ancestor, something Simon has learned from James Grime’s “Every Baby is a Royal Baby” video on Numberphile. In this simplified version, there’re only 6 people per generation. Simon was throwing two dice to determine who the two parents were for every person (in the case when both dice came out to be the same number, this was considered “virgin birth” or simply that the father had come from outside the limited sample Simon was working with).

the present generation
Simon marking who the children of a person were in pink pencil
Some parents don’t have the digits corresponding to their children written next to them, but letters N and E: N means that that person from the parent generation had no children and is therefore related to no one from the future generations; E on the conrrary, means that that person “has been busy” and is related to everyone in the next generation!
identifying the most recent common ancestor generation and the identical ancestors generation
the all common ancestors generation
Logic, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Notes on everyday life, Simon teaching

On Incompleteness

Simon is enchanted by Gödel’s incompleteness theorem (that he has learned about from Numberphile) and keeps talking about it:

“There’re problems that we just can’t solve. But if we prove that we can’t prove them, then we prove them! We can’t prove that we can’t prove that we can’t prove, and so on… Quirky! Standard math doesn’t really accept that because the statement goes on forever: you’ll just never get to what we can’t prove. What follows from Gödel’s incompleteness theorem is that that statement is actually true!”

The same evening, Simon is also bothered about the lies pupils are told in school. He repeatedly quotes James Grime that it’s a big lie that mathematics is about numbers. — “What is mathematics about? Mathematics is actually about proving! But there’s one more lie that even professional mathematicians don’t know. It’s that it’s about logic. Actually, mathematicians are a lot more creative!”

Milestones, Murderous Maths, Simon teaching, Simon's sketch book

A new tour of Simon’s sketch book

The fertility formula, to predict the population the following year:

A fake number (called “Wau”) to imagine infinity (via Numberphile):

Drawing a square root of 5 (via James Grime):

dsc_1686566465058.jpg

Pebbling a Chessboard (via Numberphile):

Kolakoski Sequence:

Proof for probabilities in a Wythoff’s game

Probability that everyone will be eliminated simultaneously in Simon’s “Hat Game” (a card game he invented):

Finite List of Primes:

Creating consecutive numbers by using various operators to connect four fours:

Math Tricks, Murderous Maths, Simon makes gamez, Simon teaching

Random Field Card Trick

Simon has invented this card trick using a random field of cards and allowing him to predict nearly the whole path through the field. You can play along as a viewer and see how Simon will nearly guess your card (the card that your finger will end up on at the end of the trick), narrowing his final guess down to just a couple of cards (three in this case).

This trick is a version of Kruscal Count. Simon learned about random fields and Kruscal Count from a video by James Grime on the Singing Banana channel.

Coding, Java, live stream, Logic, Murderous Maths, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code

Liva Stream #13. Math Puzzle: Logic.

In this live session, Simon works a little on his 15s puzzle redo that he started in his previous live session: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixkLFYcb0T0 and programs a math/logic puzzle, checking whether the statement “Every card with a T on one side has a 3 on the other” is true or false. The original puzzle comes from an old video by James Grime, recorded before Simon was born (the fact that Simon finds particularly funny):