Exercise, Experiments, Notes on everyday life, Physics, Simon teaching, Together with sis, Trips

A lot of fluid dynamics at Technopolis

Today we celebrated my 40th birthday with a family trip to Technopolis, a mekka for science-minded kids in the Belgian town of Mechelen. (Technically, my real birthday is in two days from now, but I have messed with the arrow of time a little, to speed things up).
The entrance to the museum is adorned with a red lever that anyone can use to lift up a car!
Simon and Neva lifting up the car
The beautiful marble run and math and physics demo in one
Galton’s board and Gaussian distribution
Simon explaining the general relativity demo, which is part of the marble run
This was probably the winner among all the exhibits: a wall to climb with a mission (Simon figured it out rather quickly – one had to turn “mirrors” to change the direction of light (green projection) and have the light rays extinguish the targets.
Simon tried to explain this to other children, but they only seemed to want to climb. It was sad to see how no one cared to listen (well, except for Neva of course).
Simon was already familiar with this optical illusion. Later he saw another version of this on an Antwerp facade.
The logic gates were too easy.
the center of gravity
Huge catenaroids! Something Simon had already demonstrated to us at home, but now in XXL!
cof
And huge vortices! Another passion.
Hydrodynamic levitation! Hydrodynamic levitation!
Look! A standing wave!
And another standing wave!

Here Simon explains one more effect he has played with at home, the Magnus effect.

Coding, Geometry Joys, JavaScript, Magformers, motor skills, Simon's Own Code

The Magformers saga continued

Oops, the Magformers are back in our life. I thought that Simon was over Magformers (which he built with excessively when he was six), but he has picked them up again and taken them to a new level. He seems to be using Magformers to illustrate his increasingly philosophical thoughts in the pauses he takes between lessons and programming. Yesterday, he was quite disturbed after building with the mirror piece for a while and said: “What if two mirrors reflect each other? Would that stop time?” He added: “Just for safety, I’m going to put the mirror in the box. Never, never ever put two mirrors opposite to each other!”

And there is more! Magformers the company has actually contacted Simon on his YouTube channel, saying they loved his Magformers Table program he made in JavaScript and wanted Simon to send them an e-mail and to talk to him about it! Simon put his code on GitHub and shared it, you can view his Magformers Table online here:

https://simon-tiger.github.io/magtables/magtable/

He hasn’t made it interactive yet though. This was the original plan but he got stuck.

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