Uncategorized

Modular Arithmetic visualized with Wheel Math

Simon learned this method from a MajorPrep video and was completely obsessed about it for a good couple of weeks, challenging everyone in our inner circle to factorize numbers using the wheels.

Simon’s proof for the 7 section circle. The remainders lie in the smallest circle (for example, the section where all the numbers are divisible by 7 have a zero in the inside circle, and in the section to the right you can see 1 in the inside i.e. all the numbers in this section mod 7 equal 1)
12 sections
5 sections
art, Coding, Crafty, Java, Milestones, Murderous Maths, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code, Simon's sketch book, Uncategorized

Simon’s Times Tables Visualization is Now a Huge Poster!

Simon has made an enormous poster from his earlier animated version of the Times Tables Visualization! Simon is hoping to present this project at the Processing Community Day in Amsterdam in January 2019. The poster is already being printed!

 

Simon writes: This is a visualization for the times tables from 1 to 200.
Start with a circle with 200 points. Label the points from 0-199, then from 200-399, then from 400-599, and so on (you’re labeling the same point several times).

We’ll first do the 2x table. 2×1=2, so we connect 1 to 2. 2×2=4, so we connect 2 to 4, and so on.

2×100=200, where’s the 200? It goes in a circle so 200 is where the 0 is, and now you can keep going. Now you could keep going beyond 199, but actually, you’re going to get the same lines you already had!

For the code in Processing, I mapped the two numbers I wanted to connect up (call them i), which are in between 0 and 200, to a range between 0 and 2π. That gave me a fixed radius (I used 75px) and an angle (call it θ). Then I converted those to x and y by multiplying the radius by cos(θ) for x, and the radius by sin(θ) for y. That gave me a coordinate for each point (and even in between points, so you can do the in between times tables as well!) Then I connect up those coordinates with a line. Now I just do this over and over again, until all points are connected to something.

Unfortunately, Processing can only create and draw on a window that is smaller than a screen. So instead of programming a single 2000px x 4000px poster, I programmed 8 1000px x 1000px pieces. Then I just spliced them together.

Idea: Times Tables, Mandelbrot and the Heart of Mathematics video by Mathologer
Code: by Simon Tiger
Download the animated version here: https://github.com/simon-tiger/times_tables

Coding, JavaScript, Murderous Maths, Simon makes gamez, Simon's Own Code

Muredo in JavaScript

Simon programmed this game a couple of weeks ago but I have waited to publish the video as I hoped he would finish it and get in on GitHub. Unfortunately he got stuck and didn’t return to the project since then, this why I’m now publishing an unfinished game. The unfinished code is on Simon’s GitHub: https://github.com/simon-tiger/muredo

Link to the current version of the game (try playing it online): https://simon-tiger.github.io/muredo/muredo/

Simon writes: “The game board is ready, you can move the game pieces on to the board and roll the die. As the next step, I want to have a feature of highlighting the correct tile – how can I do that?

I also don’t have the following things yet: the multiplying feature, choosing one of multiple options and the winning condition.”

I love Simon’s color choice and the whole interface. Originally, it’s a Japanese game and I think he has made it look very much like spring in Japan.

The objective of the game is to fill in the little square making a 3×3 grid. A player throws the dice and puts one game piece on the corresponding place on the board. When she throws again, she can multiply the value on the die by the value of the place where she has her game piece (or game pieces) if the product of the hat multiplication sum can be found among the nine numbers on the 3×3 grid. If not, the player either puts another game piece on the board, to fill the value of the last throw, or misses a turn.