Coding, English and Text-Based Data, JavaScript, Milestones, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code

Announcing Simon’s First Live Stream!

Simon is planning to do his fist coding live stream (online lesson he is going to teach to his audience on YouTube) on Thursday, 2 November at 5 p.m. CET. Topic: Simon’s own speech recognition library Speechjs (in JavaScript). You can view the stream live at our channel on YouTube, please subscribe at:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCetWQQLtesZsA0xuqJBkoZw

Simon has been preparing for days, teaching himself how to use Open Broadcast Studio and making a presentation in Google Docs with over 20 slides (see some of them below). He made the presentation all by himself; when I read it through this afternoon I only found one spelling mistake.

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Coding, Community Projects, Contributing, English and Text-Based Data, JavaScript, Milestones, Simon teaching, Simon's Own Code

Simon made his own speech library: Speechjs

Simon has just finished working on his first library,  a #speechlibrary Speechjs. You can find Simon’s library on GitHub: https://github.com/simon-tiger/speechjs

Simon also added a reference page at: https://github.com/simon-tiger/speechjs/wiki/Reference

You can use this library for any project that uses #speechrecognition and/or speech synthesis. Simon has put it under the MIT (permissive) license, to make sure everyone can use it for free, he emphasized.

While writing the library, Simon also recycled various code he found online, but essentially this library is his own code. He calls the library “just a layer on top of the web speech API” (that means you’re limited to what your browser supports).

 

Coding, English and Text-Based Data

Computer repeats after Simon

Following the exciting text-to-speech and speech-to-text projects yesterday, this morning Simon made a basic speech-to-text-to-speech demo, which means that the computer can now repeat (parrot) everything Simon says.

Simon relied on what he learned during Daniel Shiffman’s two latest live streams on the Coding Train channel in building these projects.

Coding, English and Text-Based Data, JavaScript, Milestones

Almost talking to the computer!

This is one of those wow projects, so much fun! Simon built his Text-to-Speech and Speech-to-Text demos following Daniel Shiffman’s recent live streams on working with the p5.Speech library and added some extra style features. This basically means that you can type anything on your computer and hear it say what you’ve typed (in any voice or language!) or, in what Simon said was an easier project, yell something to your computer (I love you!) and watch it type it out for you. The next step will be combining the two and including that code into a chat bot code.

You can play with Simon’s Text-to-Speech demo on GitHub at:

Basic text to speech example: https://simon-tiger.github.io/p5_speech/01_text2speech/

Example using different voices: https://simon-tiger.github.io/p5_speech/02_voices/

Basic speech to text example: https://simon-tiger.github.io/p5_speech/03_speech2text/

Code/ repo: https://github.com/simon-tiger/p5_speech